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General Information

The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is one of the world’s leading research institutions, and Europe’s flagship laboratory for the life sciences.

EMBL locations

EMBL operates from five sites across Europe: 

Governance of EMBL

EMBL is an inter-governmental organisation funded by public research monies from 20 member states, including much of Europe and Israel, and one associate member, Australia. EMBL is currently led by the Director General, Professor Iain Mattaj, appointed by the governing body, EMBL Council. The Council is comprised of representatives of all member, and associate member, states.

EMBL’s missions

The cornerstones of EMBL's mission are to:

  • perform basic research in molecular biology
  • train scientists, students and visitors at all levels
  • offer vital services to scientists in the member states
  • develop new instruments and methods
  • actively engage in technology transfer.

Research at EMBL

Research at EMBL emphasises experimental analysis at multiple levels of biological organisation, from the molecule to the organism, as well as computational biology, bioinformatics and systems biology.

Research is conducted by approximately 85 independent groups covering the spectrum of molecular biology. EMBL is international, innovative and interdisciplinary. Its 1,400 employees from 60 nations represent scientific disciplines including biology, physics, chemistry and computer science.

Training opportunities

Outstanding training is available at multiple levels: PhD students, postdocs and visiting scientists. EMBL hosts a comprehensive schedule of courses, conferences and workshops, many organised in collaboration with EMBL's sister organisation, the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO).

Scientific services

Services provided by EMBL include:

  • core biomolecualar databases and bioinformatics tools, particularly at EMBL-EBI
  • the provision of beamlines, instrumentation and high-throughput technology for structural biology at the Hamburg and Grenoble oustations.
  • Core Facilities, which provide cost-effective and efficient access to methods and technologies that are expensive to set up or maintain, or that require considerable expense.