Top image

EMBL/EMBO Joint Conference 2006

Nikos K. Logothetis, Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany

n_logothetis

Nikos K. Logothetis

Biography

Nikos K. Logothetis is director of the department "Physiology of Cognitive Processes" at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, in Tübingen, Germany. He received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Athens, a B.S. in biology from the University of Thessaloniki, and his Ph.D. in human neurobiology from the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich.

In 1985 he moved to the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department of M.I.T., where he initially worked as a postdoctoral fellow and later as Research Scientist. In 1990 he joined the faculty of the Division of Neuroscience at the Baylor College of Medicine. Seven years later he moved to the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics to continue his work on the physiological mechanisms underlying visual perception and object recognition. His recent work includes the application of functional imaging techniques to monkeys and measurement of how the functional magnetic resonance imaging signal relates to neural activity.

Since 1992 he has been adjunct professor of neurobiology at the Salk Institute in San Diego, since 1995 adjunct professor of ophthalmology at the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, an Associate of the Neurosciences Insitute, San Diego, and Senior Visiting Fellow in University College, London. He has been secretary of the council and chair of the nominating committee of the organization of Human Brain Mapping.

Logothetis is member of the German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina, of the Rodin Remediation Academy, of the Society for Neuroscience, European Neuroscience Association, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, New York Academy of Sciences, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, American Mathematical Society, International Neuropsychological Society, and Mathematical Association of America, and is a recipient of the DeBakey Award for Excellence in Science, the Golden Brain Award of the Minerva Foundation, the 2003 Louis-Jeantet Prize of Medicine, and the Zülch-Prize for Neuroscience.