Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 25 May 2016, 10:00Add to calendarHost-Microbial metabolic complementation modulates the effects of fluoropyrimidines in C. elegans survival and longevityFilipe Gomes Cabreiro, University College London, United KingdomHost: Nassos TypasSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 27 May 2016, 13:00Add to calendarP13, the EMBL macromolecular crystallography beamline at the low emittance PETRA III ring for high and low energy phasing with variable beam focussingMichele Cianci, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: The macromolecular crystallography P13 beamline is part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Integrated Facility for Structural Biology at PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) and in user operation since mid 2013. P13 is tunable across the energy range from 4 to 17.5 keV to support crystallographic data acquisition exploiting a wide range of elemental absorption edges for experimental phase determination. An adaptive Kirk-Patrick-Baez focussing system provides an X-ray beam with a high photon flux (up to 6*1012 ph/s at 9 keV), a low beam divergence (0.2 mrad (H) × 0.15 mrad (V)) and rapidly (few minutes) tunable focus size (30 μm to 150 μm, horizontally, 24 μm to 70 μm, vertically) to adapt to diverse experimental situations. The ARINAX MD2 diffractometer and the small focus size of the beam facilitate collection of accurate diffraction data from small crystals (down to 5 µm linear dimensions) and allow precise helical scans on needle-shaped crystals. The mini-κ goniometer attached to the MD2 spindle axis allows crystal re-orientation for optimized anomalous data collection.
Data collections at energies as low as 4 keV (3.1 Å) are possible due to a beamline design minimizing background and maximizing photon flux in particular at low energy (up to 1011 ph/sec at 4 keV), a custom calibration of the PILATUS 6M-F detector for use at low energies, and the availability of a helium path. At high energies, the high photon flux (5.4*1011 ph/s at 17.5 keV) combined with a large area detector mounted on a 2θ-arm allows data collection to sub-atomic resolution (0.55 Å). Automated sample mounting is available by means of the robotic sample changer 'MARVIN' with a duty-cycle of less than one minute and a dewar capacity of 160 samples. In close proximity to the beamline, laboratories have been set up for sample preparation and characterization; a laboratory specifically equipped for on-site heavy atom derivatization with a library of more than 150 compounds is available to beamline users.
The capabilities of the beamline are demonstrated by examples of sulphur-SAD phasing enabled by X-ray beams adjusted optimally both in terms of beam size and X-ray energy and by successful structure solutions from small crystals.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 30 May 2016, 10:00Add to calendarTranscriptional and Epigenetic Mechanisms of DepressionEric Nestler, Nash Family Professor and Chair, Department of Neuroscience Director, Friedman Brain Institute Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY, USAHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Depression is a common, chronic, and debilitating disease. Although many patients benefit from antidepressant medications or other therapies, only about half of depressed patients show a complete remission, which underscores the need for more effective agents. The mechanisms that precipitate depression, such as stress, are incompletely understood. One mystery of the disease is its long-lasting nature and delayed response to antidepressant treatment. This persistence is thought to be mediated by slowly developing but stable adaptations in the brain, which might include regulation of gene expression and chromatin structure.
We have used chronic social defeat stress as an animal model of depression that mimics certain symptoms of human depression. Prolonged exposure to an aggressor induces lasting changes in mouse behavior such as social avoidance, which are reversed by chronic (but not acute) treatment with available antidepressants. Importantly, roughly one-third of mice subjected to social defeat stress do not exhibit these deleterious behaviors and appear resilient. We are exploring the molecular basis of defeat-induced behavioral pathology, antidepressant action, and resilience by analyzing genome-wide changes in gene expression and chromatin modifications. Our work to date has focused on the nucleus accumbens, a key brain reward region implicated in aspects of depression, as well as several other limbic brain regions. Parallel work has focused on homologous regions in the brains of depressed humans examined postmortem.
Together, this work is providing novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying depression and other stress-related disorders. The findings also suggest novel leads for the development of new antidepressant treatments. For example, our findings on resilience suggest the novel approach of developing medications that promote resilience and not just those that oppose the deleterious effects of stress.

Biography

Dr. Nestler is the Nash Family Professor of Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, where he serves as Chair of the Department of Neuroscience and Director of the Friedman Brain Institute. He received his B.A., Ph.D., and M.D. degrees, and psychiatry residency training, from Yale University. He served on the Yale faculty from 1987-2000, where he was the Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, and Director of the Division of Molecular Psychiatry. He moved to Dallas in 2000 where he served as the Lou and Ellen McGinley Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center until moving to New York in 2008. Dr. Nestler is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a past President of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and President Elect of the Society for Neuroscience. The goal of Dr. Nestler s research is to better understand the molecular mechanisms of addiction and depression based on work in animal models, and to use this information to develop improved treatments of these disorders.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 30 May 2016, 11:00Add to calendarVisualizing the molecular sociology at the HeLa cell nuclear periphery:
Moving into the elegant era of in situ cryo-sample preparation for cellular electron tomography
Julia Mahamid , MPI Martinsried, GermanyHost: Martin BeckSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 30 May 2016, 14:15Add to calendarPostranscriptional regulation of gene expression in cardiac diseaseNorbert Huebner, MDC Berlin, GermanyHost: Lars SteinmetzSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 1 June 2016, 13:00Add to calendarAre EMBL Scientists Ready for PreprintsRon Vale, UCSF, San Francisco, USAHost: Maria LeptinSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Ron Vale (UCSF), Maria Leptin (EMBO), and Bernd Pulverer (EMBO Press) would like to invite you to a presenation and discussion about preprints.

A preprint is a complete scientific manuscript, often the same as one being submitted to a journal, that is uploaded by the authors to a public server. Physicists widely use preprints to rapidly communicate their research findings through a server called arXiv as well as using peer-review publication. Is it time for biologists to do the same? What are the benefits of using preprints for junior and senior scientists? Do funding agencies and journals support the use of preprints in biology? What are the concerns or potential unintended consequences of preprints? These questions, and others that you might have, will be addressed in this session. At least half of the time will be allotted for your specific questions. We also will discuss outcomes from two recent meetings (Feb. 16/17 at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and May 24 at the NIH), which were both focused on the role that preprints might play in biology. For more information, go to ASAPbio.org or read the commentary on preprints published in Science Magazine on May 20.

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 2 June 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedTimothy J. Mitchison, Harvard University, USAHost: François NédélecLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 2 June 2016, 15:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAnna Kreshuk, HCI, University of Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 3 June 2016, 11:00Add to calendarNeural circuit mechanisms for the initiation and adaptive control of aversive associative learningJoshua Johansen, Laboratory for the Neural Circuitry of Memory, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama, JapanHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 6 June 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPhillipp Holliger, MRC-LMB Cambridge, United KingdomHost: Lahari Yeramala EMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 10 June 2016, 10:00Add to calendarMaking, Breaking and Linking MemoriesSheena Josselyn, Program in Neurosciences and Mental Health, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Making, Breaking and Linking Memories .

A fundamental goal of neuroscience is to understand how information is encoded and stored in the brain. The physical or functional representation of a memory (the memory trace or engram ) is thought to be sparsely encoded over a distributed memory network. However, identifying the precise neurons which make up a memory trace has challenged for scientists since Karl Lashley s search for the engram in the 1950 s (Josselyn, 2015; Lashley, 1950; Josselyn, 2010; Josselyn et al., 2015). Moreover, it was not known why one neuron (rather than its neighbour) was involved in a given memory trace. We previously showed that lateral amygdala (LA) neurons with increased levels of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP/Ca++ Responsive Element Binding protein), are preferentially activated by fear memory expression, suggesting they are selectively recruited into the memory trace (Han et al., 2007). We, and others, went on to show that these neurons were critical components of the memory network by selectively ablating (Han et al., 2009) or inactivating them (Zhou et al., 2009). These findings established a causal link between a specific neuronal subpopulation and memory expression, thereby identifying critical neurons within the memory trace. Furthermore, these results suggest that at least within the LA, eligible neurons compete for inclusion in a memory trace, and that the winners of this competition are determined by relative CREB function. Although competition between neurons, axons and synapses is necessary for refining neural circuits in development, little is known about competition between neurons in the adult brain. Our recent results suggest that this neuronal competition during memory formation limits the overall size of the memory trace (number of winning neurons) and is a mechanism that links (or disambiguates) related memories in the LA.
Memory impairments are a hallmark of aging, major mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia and depression) as well as neurological disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Therefore, understanding how the brain encodes and stores information is highly relevant to both mental health and mental illness.

Biography

Sheena Josselyn is a Senior Scientist in the Neurosciences & Mental Health program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and an Associate Professor in the departments of Psychology and Physiology and the Institute of Medical Sciences at the University of Toronto in Canada. She holds a Canada Research Chair in Molecular and Cellular Cognition and is an EJLB Scholar. Her undergraduate degrees and a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology were granted by Queen s University in Kingston. Sheena received a PhD in Neuroscience/Psychology from the University of Toronto with Dr. Franco Vaccarino as her supervisor. She conducted post-doctoral work with Dr. Mike Davis (Yale University) and Dr. Alcino Silva (UCLA). Her program of research is dedicated to understanding the neural basis of cognitive function and dysfunction. To unravel the molecular, cellular and circuit processes that underlie learning and memory, her lab uses a multidisciplinary approach that focuses on mouse models and attempts to translate these basic findings into humans.

Dr. Josselyn received the Innovations in Psychopharmacology Award from the Canadian College of Neuropsychopharmacology (CCNP) and the Effron Award from the American College of Neurospchycopharmacology (ACNP). She sits on the editorial board for the Neuropsychopharmacology, Journal of Neuroscience and the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory and serves on CIHR and NIH peer review panels

External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 10 June 2016, 13:00Add to calendarDissecting bacterial lifestyle with systems-based approachesNassos Typas, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: We work at the interface of systems biology and molecular mechanism. On one hand we develop and utilize high-throughput quantitative approaches that reveal functional interactions between genes at a whole cell level. On the other hand, we zoom into these networks to understand how different functional modules are interconnected, often at a detailed mechanistic level. Here I will present how we use such approaches to shed light into gene function and pathway organization, to understand the action of drugs and their interplay when combined, and to probe how protein machineries operate at the bacterial cell envelope- how they are organized, how they coordinate their actions and how the cell senses when they are malfunctioning. We have also recently moved our approaches to the host-pathogen interface and the dynamic microbial communities formed in our gut. Our main goals are to: a) elucidate pathways Salmonella uses to hijack its host machinery and b) to probe how gut microbial communities are formed, how they react to nutrition and pharmaceuticals, and how their composition and characteristics affects our health.
Science and Society
Friday, 10 June 2016, 15:00Add to calendarDigitising humanness across genomes, epigenomes and cellsGiuseppe Testa, University of Milan and European Institute of Oncology, ItalyHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Our biologies are increasingly unfolding within multiple parallel worlds, as a result of two convergent streams of innovation: the digitisation of living forms, and the digitisation of our forms of knowledge and sociality.

The biotechnological toolkit allows in fact to study biological phenomena more and more as integrations of digital data, sampled and archived in distinct yet increasingly interconnected spaces. Indeed, the very expansion of the life sciences into the fabric of our time is rooted in the eminent flexibility of their technological core, which entails at its most basic the following two capacities: i) that of encompassing an increasing range of biological objects and functions in digital format; and ii) that of intervening into biological objects and functions by harnessing their digital codes through a panoply of molecular switches. From genomes to epigenomes, from cellular lineages to organs, all more or less classically defined levels of biological organization are now amenable to the digitizing ambition of the life sciences. This digital gaze renders all such levels measurable and compatible with each other as representations of our health and disease states, avatars of virtually all aspects of human biology that are being progressively domesticated as objects of inquiry and experimentation.

All the while, the pervasive digitisation of our knowledge and relationships is yielding just as many avatars of human sociality, in a public sphere that becomes transparent intersection of spaces hitherto considered eminently private: the profiles of our consumption, the traces of our ideas and emotions, the patterns and locations of our exposed lives that have come to represent the increasingly fragmented projections of our selves.

Against this backdrop, I probe the mutual constitution of epistemic and societal arrangements in biomedicine, introducing the notion of scale as an innovative tool for policy-relevant theorizing and engagement, for scientists and lay publics alike. Specifically, the notion of scale captures and exposes the deepening gaze of the life sciences in exploring matters of major societal concern through an array of distinct yet compatible levels of inquiry, enabling the simultaneous investigation of the corresponding scales of governance and regulation through which developments in the life sciences are feeding into society, and vice versa. To this end, I build on recent advances from two streams of my scholarship, the use of epigenetic reprogramming for patient-specific disease models and the analysis of participatory and regulatory practices at the interface of technoscientific and societal innovation.
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 15 June 2016, 13:15Add to calendarTo be announcedVirgile Viasnoff, MechanoBiology Institute, SingaporeHost: Francois Nédélec Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 17 June 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCharlotte Uetrecht, European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg, GermanyHost: Rob MeijersSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 23 June 2016, 11:30Add to calendarEnhancing ethical reflection about research and innovationSimone van der Burg, IQ Healthcare, NetherlandsHost: Helke HillebrandLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: How soft impacts require imagination and tough thinking

People nowadays live in a human-made environment, or technotope. Their lives are entangled with technology.

Because technology does not only bring gifts but also costs and hazards, it is important to reflect on what a good technology is and, indeed, whether a technology contributes to making human (social) lives better . It is the purpose of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) to enhance reflection about the impacts of future technologies at an early stage, when these technologies are still being researched and developed. RRI is typically concerned with technologies which are still in the making .

This lecture introduces the concept of RRI, as well as the understanding of the relation between science and society that gave rise to it. Using a variety of examples from the medical domain, it will argue for the enhancement of early-stage reflection with stakeholders about the ways in which future technologies can influence human lives, in order to make more imaginative and more informed decisions that have more chance to lead to technologies which are acceptable to the public and widely used.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 24 June 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedTuhin Bhowmick, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 27 June 2016, 11:00Add to calendarSlow, closed, expensive and ineffective: How science publishing is killing science and how to fix itMichael Eisen, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Professor of Genetics, Genomics and Development, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USAHost: Shane MorleyCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 1 July 2016, 13:00Add to calendarEMDB and EMPIAR - status, plans and challengesArdan Patwardhan, EMBL-EBI, United KingdomHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: The study of the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules and assemblies, and their organization in the cellular context is of utmost importance for understanding many biological processes. For example the ribosome synthesizes protein from nucleic acid and its function is intimately related to its structure and changes therein. Multiple ribosomes have been observed in a cellular context processing the same strand of mRNA in order to synthesize protein efficiently.

Cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and electron tomography (ET) have become indispensable tools for molecular and cellular structural biology. In recent years technological advances such as the director electron detector have led to a breakthrough in the level of observable detail. We are now witnessing a period of dramatic expansion in the number of people using cryoEM techniques for structure determination. Moreover the capabilities of the technique are being pushed to the very limits, for example, by using phase plate technology to examine low molecular weight samples and by exploiting image-processing techniques to obtain 3D snapshots of structurally variable samples.

The open and public access to structural data is of utmost importance for validation, development, testing and training. The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) archive was established at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in 2002 and is the authoritative source for 3DEM data. Against the backdrop of technological advances, EMDB has experienced rapid growth and now contains over 3600 structures. In 2014 the Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) started EMPIAR the electron microscopy pilot image archive to store raw image data related to EMDB structures. The challenge here has been in dealing with the storage and transfer of large datasets. EMPIAR now holds circa 50 datasets and approximately 25 TB/month is downloaded on average. In this talk I will present the status of the archives and of on-going initiatives related to the archives such as the EMDataBank Validation Challenges, efforts underway on the topics of validation, data-mining and integration, and future challenges and opportunities.
Science and Society
Monday, 4 July 2016, 15:00Add to calendarProposals for climate engineering: potentials, limitations, uncertainties and risksMark Lawrence, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Potsdam, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Friday, 8 July 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedSara Cuylen, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, AustriaHost: Jan EllenbergSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 8 July 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedHennig Tidow, University of Hamburg, GermanyHost: Christian LöwSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Company Representative
Monday, 11 July 2016, 11:00Add to calendarOrbitrap technologies and applicationsAlexander Makarov, Thermo Fisher Scientific, GermanyHost: Mikhail SavitskiLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Tuesday, 12 July 2016, 18:00Add to calendarWhat Neanderthals teach us about Human EvolutionJean-Jacques Hublin, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 15 July 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDiana Freire, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 18 July 2016, 14:00Add to calendarElectrostatic model of assembly and disintegration of the influenza virus protein scaffoldOleg Batishchev, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian FederationHost: Dmitri SvergunSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: Influenza A virus is an enveloped negative strand RNA virus. Its outer envelope consists of the lipid membrane with incorporated glycoproteins and proton channel M2. The inner envelope of the virion is a membrane-associated scaffold of matrix protein M1, which contacts both the viral RNP and the lipid envelope. Formation and disintegration of the protein scaffold are essential processes for influenza replication and infection. Both involve interaction of M1 with the lipid membrane; both are controlled by pH. We investigate the physico-chemical mechanism of these processes using the combination of electrochemical and fluorescent measurements with AFM. In neutral media, the adsorption of M1 protein on the lipid bilayer was electrostatic in nature and reversible. Acidification drives conformational changes in M1 molecules and increase of their charge leading to partial desorption due to increased repulsion between M1 monomers still stuck to the membrane. This repulsive force could generate tension for membrane rupture, as it was demonstrated for lipid vesicles coated with M1. Thus, electrostatic forces could explain M1 protein scaffold disintegration at low pH and most likely stretch the lipid membrane, promoting fusion pore widening for RNP release. Performing the measurements of M1 adsorption at different ionic strengths of the solution, we estimated the charge of M1 in the concerned range of pH. Our results show that at pH of late endosome scaffold protein M1 significantly changes its charge meaning that electrostatics could be the main driving force in disassembly of Influenza A virus protein envelope. On the other hand, we demonstrated that assembly of M1 molecules in helices should occur in a pH-independent manner. Modelling these processes using Derjagin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory (DLVO) allows us to estimate the energy of M1-M1 interactions.
Career Day
Thursday, 21 July 2016, 10:00Add to calendarEMBL Career DayVarious speakers, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: EICAT & EMBLEMATC Auditorium, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Organised by EICAT (PhD and Postdoctoral Programmes) together with EMBLEM, Career Day provides an overview of alternative, non-academic career possibilities for scientists from all EMBL sites and the local scientific community.
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Friday, 5 August 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedLisa Oestereich, Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für Tropenmedizin, GermanyHost: Christian Löw / Sophie ZimmermannSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 26 August 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAli Flayhan, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 5 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDoreen Matthies, Subramanian group, NIH, USAHost: Marco MarciaEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 7 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBenjamin F. Cravatt, Department of Chemical Physiology, The Scripps Research Institute, , USAHost: Maja KöhnThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 9 September 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedElke Dittman, University of Potsdam, GermanyHost: Victor Lamzin / Claudia HackenbergSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 22 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDolf Weijers, Wageningen University, NetherlandsHost: Marcus HeislerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 23 September 2016, 10:00Add to calendarDeciphering the physiology of hematopoiesis by fate mapping and endogenous barcodingHans-Reimer Rodewald, Division of Cellular Immunology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Abstract:

Information on the hematopoietic system has long relied on in vitro in colony assays and in vivo by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) into myeloablated recipients. Given that single cells can rebuild the blood and immune systems upon transplantation, HSC posses huge expansion potential (also coined self-renewal), and under these conditions single HSC are multipotent. Indeed, self-renewal and multipotency are often used as the key HSC-defining hallmarks, and it is commonly assumed that these properties also characterize HSC in situ. High throughput and other single cell technologies are currently being applied to study HSC properties but these approaches, too, may or may not reveal the functions of HSC under physiological conditions. To study the normal functions of HSC in the bone marrow under non-perturbed conditions, we have generated an in vivo experimental fate mapping system that allows tracking of the activity of HSC in situ under steady state conditions and post challenges. We quantified and modeled the cell fluxes through the hematopoietic system during its initial development and maintenance in adult mice, and obtained estimates on the numbers of HSC that contribute to adult hematopoiesis. In parallel, we are developing an endogenous Cre recombinase-dependent barcoding system that, again non-invasively, allows permanent genetic tagging of cells. We are currently characterizing the properties of this versatile tool to study cellular diversity and clonal dynamics in multicellular organs. By linking fate mapping with endogenous barcoding we aim at deciphering the physiology of hematopoiesis in vivo.


Short biography:
Hans-Reimer Rodewald is currently head of the Division for Cellular Immunology at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg. The Rodewald laboratory has a long-standing interest in the development and function of the hematopoietic system. Work from this laboratory included the identification of lineage-committed progenitors, and essential cytokine signals in early T cell development. The Rodewald lab discovered thymus epithelial progenitor activity, leading to medullary epithelial islets, as a developmental mechanism of epithelial organogenesis, and identified the cervical thymus in the mouse. His laboratory developed mouse mutants, including specifically mast cell-deficient mice, to address open questions in mast cell biology, Recently, Rodewald and his colleagues uncovered the inbuilt property of the thymus for progenitor-independent thymus function (thymus autonomy), and noticed the pathological consequences of lack of cell competition in the thymus, i.e. T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Current activities focus on the development of genetic tools to track stem cell output in vivo, aiming at deciphering the physiology of unperturbed hematopoiesis in vivo.
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 7 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTherapygenetics: Taking GxE interaction into the clinicThalia Eley, Professor of Developmental Behavioural Genetics, Department of Social Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Thursday, 13 October 2016, 15:00Add to calendarLab Coats in Hollywood: Scientists Impact on Cinema, Cinema s Influence on ScienceDavid A. Kirby, Centre for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Manchester, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 17 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedNeil Brockdorff, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 18 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCayetano Gonzalez, Barcelona Institute for Science and Technology, SpainHost: Anne EphrussiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 21 October 2016, 10:00Add to calendarThe First Steps in Vision: Cell types, Circuits and RepairBotond Roska, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical, Research, Basel, SwitzerlandHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 28 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarFrom Vision to Decisions and Navigation in Mouse CortexMatteo Carandini, Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 October 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMaria Molledo, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Christian LöwSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 7 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPeter Tompa, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Brussels, BelgiumHost: Danielle DesravinesEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 14 November 2016, 15:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEduardo Moreno, University Bern, SwitzerlandHost: Takashi HiiragiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 24 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJames Sharpe, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), SpainHost: Marcus HeislerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 25 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetics and Rett SyndromeAdrian Bird, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 1 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedXin Liu, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USAHost: Irene Garcia FerrerEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 2 December 2016, 14:00Add to calendarGlobal AMR: When two worlds collide Timothy Walsh, Cardiff University, United KingdomHost: Wiebke SchulzeILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 2 December 2016, 15:00Add to calendarThe prenatal sex steroid theory of autismSimon Baron-Cohen, Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Autism affects males more often than females. This is likely to be true even after taking into account under-diagnosis of females with Asperger Syndrome. One candidate biological mechanism for this is prenatal sex steroid hormones, that shape brain development, which themselves are under genetic control and have epigenetic properties. In this lecture I summarize work from our lab from 4 lines of evidence: (1) Testing if one sex steroid hormone, testosterone, measured in the womb is associated with individual differences in typical children s language and social development, attention to detail and narrow interests, autistic traits, and brain structure and function. (2) Testing if elevated prenatal sex steroid levels are associated with autism itself. (3) Testing if proxies of prenatal sex steroid levels in people with autism are also atypical. (4) Testing if post-natal sex steroid hormones in autism are elevated. These studies implicate a specific biological pathway (the Δ4 sex steroid pathway) as one important factor in the aetiology of autism. A recent animal model testing this theory is discussed, and the ethics of translating these findings is considered.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 16 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedClaire Wyart, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, , FranceHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 16 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 12 January 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedKay Grünewald, Structural Biology & Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Manikandan KaruppasamyEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 21 February 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Barford, MRC-LMB (Cambridge, United KingdomHost: Irina CornaciuEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 7 April 2017, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBernd Pulverer, EMBO, GermanyHost: Erika Pellegrini ILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 19 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJennifer Doudna, Li Ka Shing Chancellor's Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences, Professor, Molecular & Cell Biology; Professor, Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USAHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo