Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 30 August 2016, 14:00Add to calendarPhosphoinositide control of early endocytic eventsKay Schink, Oslo University Hospital, NorwayHost: Carsten SchultzSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 2 September 2016, 10:00Add to calendarEvolution, functions and pathogenesis of the Nse3 subunit of the SMC5/6 complexJan Palecek, CEITEC, Czech RepublicHost: Christian HaeringRoom 13-518 a + b, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 2 September 2016, 13:00Add to calendarThe molecular 'exchange' that decides the fate of commissural axon.Tuhin Bhowmick, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: An increasing number of molecules have been identified to control the formation of neuronal networks during the development of the central nervous system. Two major factors that govern the growth of axons are the concentration gradient of the secreted guidance cue molecules and the repertoire of receptors available on the growth cone. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that guide the migrating axon still remains limited. Using a combinatorial approach including crystallography, solution scattering and other biophysical techniques we have studied the interaction of two secreted guidance cues, Netrin-1 and Draxin. Our studies reveal that Netrin-1 has a modular binding mechanism utilizing multiple binding sites which can be available to different receptors in a context dependent manner. Draxin can modulate the availability of these sites. Together, these findings propose a molecular mechanism into the receptor clustering mediated by Netrin-1 and Draxin that govern the axon growth trajectory of a commissural neuron migrating from the roof plate towards the floor plate.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 5 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarSingle-Particle Cryo-EM of small protein complexes and membrane proteinsDoreen Matthies, Subramanian group, NIH, USAHost: Marco MarciaEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 5 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarSelf-repair promotes microtubule rescueCharlotte Aumeier, CEA Grenoble, FranceHost: Peter LenartSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Wednesday, 7 September 2016, 10:00Add to calendarProtein-nucleic acid interaction: the case of human thrombin and its DNA aptamersAndrea Pica, University of Naples, ItalyHost: Marquez Jose AntonioEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
CANCELLED - Wednesday, 7 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBenjamin F. Cravatt, Department of Chemical Physiology, The Scripps Research Institute, , USAHost: Maja KöhnThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 8 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarStructural analysis of influenza A virus mediated membrane fusion intermediates by Volta-phase plate cryo-electron tomographyPetr Chlanda, NIH, Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, USAHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 9 September 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedElke Dittman, University of Potsdam, GermanyHost: Victor Lamzin / Claudia HackenbergSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 12 September 2016, 09:30Add to calendarBuilding a bigger brain: genetic bases for the evolution of the human neocortexGregory Wray, Duke University, USAHost: David GarfieldSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 13 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarDNA and RNA processing by pharmaceutically relevant metalloenzymes: insights from multiscale simulationsMarco de Vivo, IIT Genova, ItalyHost: Marco MarciaEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Company Representative
Monday, 19 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarAdvances in Microscopy-based Single Cell IsolationChris Wetzel, MMI Microscopy-based Single Cell Isolation, GermanyHost: Stefan TerjungSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: This presentation is to give an overview on a demo by MMI on Single Cell Isolation. The equipment will be available 19-22 September.

All interested are welcome, please contact almf@embl.de if you want to try single cell isolation during this demo!
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 19 September 2016, 14:15Add to calendarTo be announcedClare Buckley, Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King's College London, United KingdomHost: Alba Diz-MunozSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 22 September 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDolf Weijers, Wageningen University, NetherlandsHost: Marcus HeislerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 23 September 2016, 10:00Add to calendarDeciphering the physiology of hematopoiesis by fate mapping and endogenous barcodingHans-Reimer Rodewald, Division of Cellular Immunology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Abstract:

Information on the hematopoietic system has long relied on in vitro in colony assays and in vivo by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) into myeloablated recipients. Given that single cells can rebuild the blood and immune systems upon transplantation, HSC posses huge expansion potential (also coined self-renewal), and under these conditions single HSC are multipotent. Indeed, self-renewal and multipotency are often used as the key HSC-defining hallmarks, and it is commonly assumed that these properties also characterize HSC in situ. High throughput and other single cell technologies are currently being applied to study HSC properties but these approaches, too, may or may not reveal the functions of HSC under physiological conditions. To study the normal functions of HSC in the bone marrow under non-perturbed conditions, we have generated an in vivo experimental fate mapping system that allows tracking of the activity of HSC in situ under steady state conditions and post challenges. We quantified and modeled the cell fluxes through the hematopoietic system during its initial development and maintenance in adult mice, and obtained estimates on the numbers of HSC that contribute to adult hematopoiesis. In parallel, we are developing an endogenous Cre recombinase-dependent barcoding system that, again non-invasively, allows permanent genetic tagging of cells. We are currently characterizing the properties of this versatile tool to study cellular diversity and clonal dynamics in multicellular organs. By linking fate mapping with endogenous barcoding we aim at deciphering the physiology of hematopoiesis in vivo.


Short biography:
Hans-Reimer Rodewald is currently head of the Division for Cellular Immunology at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg. The Rodewald laboratory has a long-standing interest in the development and function of the hematopoietic system. Work from this laboratory included the identification of lineage-committed progenitors, and essential cytokine signals in early T cell development. The Rodewald lab discovered thymus epithelial progenitor activity, leading to medullary epithelial islets, as a developmental mechanism of epithelial organogenesis, and identified the cervical thymus in the mouse. His laboratory developed mouse mutants, including specifically mast cell-deficient mice, to address open questions in mast cell biology, Recently, Rodewald and his colleagues uncovered the inbuilt property of the thymus for progenitor-independent thymus function (thymus autonomy), and noticed the pathological consequences of lack of cell competition in the thymus, i.e. T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Current activities focus on the development of genetic tools to track stem cell output in vivo, aiming at deciphering the physiology of unperturbed hematopoiesis in vivo.
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 27 September 2016, 15:15Add to calendarCharting the unknown Oral drugs for novel targets beyond the rule of 5Jan Kihlberg, Uppsala University, Sweden, Department of Chemistry BMC, SwedenHost: Janosch HennigSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Structural Biology, Biocomputing, Chemistry and Chemical Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 6 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarPostranscriptional regulation of gene expression in cardiac diseaseNorbert Huebner, MDC Berlin, GermanyHost: Lars SteinmetzSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 7 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTherapygenetics: Taking GxE interaction into the clinicThalia Eley, Professor of Developmental Behavioural Genetics, Department of Social Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Thursday, 13 October 2016, 15:00Add to calendarLab Coats in Hollywood: Scientists Impact on Cinema, Cinema s Influence on ScienceDavid A. Kirby, Centre for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Manchester, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: We are now in a golden age for science in popular culture. Academy Award winning films such as Gravity and The Theory of Everything, and television ratings titans like The Big Bang Theory have proven that science based popular cultural products can be both critically acclaimed and financially successful. But, the scientific community has long standing concerns about popular culture s impact on public attitudes towards science. In fact, there is significant empirical evidence showing that popular cultural products like movies can have a powerful influence on public perceptions of science. Anxiety over Hollywood science has led many scientists to become consultants for movie productions in order to influence how stories about science are told through this medium. In fact, many high profile scientific organizations including the US National Academy of Sciences and the Wellcome Trust in the UK have embraced movies as legitimate vehicles for science communication by developing initiatives to facilitate scientific involvement in the production of films. In this talk I will elaborate on the backstage role scientific experts play in negotiating information transfer between the scientific community and the entertainment community. I will also discuss the constraints filmmakers face when attempting to incorporate science into their film texts. In addition, I will explore the ways that movies made with the help of scientists have influenced science itself including how movies promote research agendas, stimulate technological development, and impact the cultural meanings of science.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 17 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarMolecular mechanisms mediating chromosome silencing by Xist RNANeil Brockdorff, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Tags: RNA
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 18 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCayetano Gonzalez, Barcelona Institute for Science and Technology, SpainHost: Anne EphrussiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 21 October 2016, 10:00Add to calendarThe First Steps in Vision: Cell types, Circuits and RepairBotond Roska, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical, Research, Basel, SwitzerlandHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 21 October 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPiotr Neumann , University of Goettingen, GermanyHost: Christian LöwSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 24 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedIlme Schlichting, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, GermanyHost: Francesco BisiakEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 28 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarProteostasis,respiration and metabolism: a ménage à trois of cellular longevityAnita Krisko, Mediterranean Institute for Life Sciences, Split,Croatia, CroatiaHost: Theodore AlexandrovRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing, Proteomics, Structural Biology
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 28 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarFrom Vision to Decisions and Navigation in Mouse CortexMatteo Carandini, Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 October 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMaria Molledo, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Christian LöwSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 7 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPeter Tompa, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Brussels, BelgiumHost: Danielle DesravinesEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 14 November 2016, 15:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEduardo Moreno, University Bern, SwitzerlandHost: Takashi HiiragiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 24 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJames Sharpe, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), SpainHost: Marcus HeislerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 25 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetics and Rett SyndromeAdrian Bird, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 25 November 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedNassos Typas, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 30 November 2016, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPascal Bernard, Ecole Normale Superieure Lyon, FranceHost: Christian HaeringRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 1 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedXin Liu, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USAHost: Irene Garcia FerrerEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 2 December 2016, 14:00Add to calendarGlobal AMR: When two worlds collide Timothy Walsh, Cardiff University, United KingdomHost: Wiebke SchulzeILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 2 December 2016, 15:00Add to calendarThe prenatal sex steroid theory of autismSimon Baron-Cohen, Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Autism affects males more often than females. This is likely to be true even after taking into account under-diagnosis of females with Asperger Syndrome. One candidate biological mechanism for this is prenatal sex steroid hormones, that shape brain development, which themselves are under genetic control and have epigenetic properties. In this lecture I summarize work from our lab from 4 lines of evidence: (1) Testing if one sex steroid hormone, testosterone, measured in the womb is associated with individual differences in typical children s language and social development, attention to detail and narrow interests, autistic traits, and brain structure and function. (2) Testing if elevated prenatal sex steroid levels are associated with autism itself. (3) Testing if proxies of prenatal sex steroid levels in people with autism are also atypical. (4) Testing if post-natal sex steroid hormones in autism are elevated. These studies implicate a specific biological pathway (the Δ4 sex steroid pathway) as one important factor in the aetiology of autism. A recent animal model testing this theory is discussed, and the ethics of translating these findings is considered.
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 16 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 16 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedClaire Wyart, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, , FranceHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 12 January 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedKay Grünewald, Structural Biology & Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Manikandan KaruppasamyEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 10 February 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPeter Dayan, Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit, Sainsbury Wellcome Centre, 25 Howland Street, London W1T 4JG, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma
Abstract: Tags: Neurobiology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 21 February 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Barford, MRC-LMB (Cambridge, United KingdomHost: Irina CornaciuEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 February 2017, 18:00Add to calendarWie Gliazellen zu Nervenzellen werden neue Ansätze zur Therapie nach GehirnverletzungenMagdalena Götz, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
Abstract: Das menschliche Gehirn kann abgestorbene Nervenzellen größtenteils nicht mehr ersetzen. Um dies zu ändern, untersuchen wir die Mechanismen, wie Nervenzellen während der Entwicklung gebildet werden, um dies dann auch im erwachsenen Gehirn nach Verletzung auslösen zu können. Tatsächlich werden Nervenzellen während der Entwicklung von radialen Gliazellen gebildet, einem Zelltyp der bislang nur als Stützzelle angesehen wurde. Diese Gliazellen gehen bei der Reifung des Säugergehirns verloren und differenzieren in andere Gliazellen aus. Dementsprechend geht auch die Fähigkeit zur Bildung neuer Nervenzellen in den meisten Gehirnregionen verloren, mit Ausnahme weniger Regionen, in welchen radiale Gliazellen erhalten bleiben, und tatsächlich zeitlebens noch neue Nervenzellen gebildet werden. In vielen anderen Wirbeltieren bleiben diese Gliazellen weitverbreitet erhalten (Barbosa et al., Science 2015), und Gehirnverletzungen können ohne Narbenbildung völlig geheilt werden (Baumgart et al., Glia 2010). Wir arbeiten daran zu verstehen, wie diese radialen Gliazellen Nervenzellen bilden, und wie wir die Bildung von Nervenzellen auch in den differenzierten Gliazellen des Säugergehirns wieder auslösen können (als Übersichtsartikel: Masserdotti et al., Development 2016). Diesbezüglich haben wir gerade in den letzten Jahren große Fortschritte gemacht und es gelingt uns nun, viele narbenbildende Gliazellen in reife Nervenzellen nach Gehirnverletzung im Mausmodell umzuwandeln (Gascon et al., Cell Stem Cell 2016). Zudem konnten wir zeigen, dass auch Gehirnregionen, in denen normalerweise keine neue Nervenzellen im Erwachsenenstadium gebildet werden, die Fähigkeit besitzen, neue Nervenzellen wieder passend in das Nervenzellnetzwerk zu integrieren und die Funktion der abgestorbenen Nervenzellen wieder zu ersetzen. Die große Frage ist nun, ob dies auch für lokal aus Gliazellen umgewandelte Nervenzellen möglich ist.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 21 March 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJürgen Knoblich, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, AustriaHost: Jan EllenbergThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Friday, 7 April 2017, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBernd Pulverer, EMBO, GermanyHost: Erika Pellegrini ILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 24 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarNutritional Regulatory Networks Marian Walhout, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USAHost: Anne-Claude GavinThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Gene regulation and metabolism lie at the heart of most biological processes. Both are accomplished by complex networks harboring hundreds of nodes and thousands of edges. We study these networks and the interactions between them mainly in the nematode C. elegans, because it is amenable to high-throughput, large-scale genetics and genomics. In addition, we study interspecies network interactions between C. elegans and bacteria, that may help illuminate interactions between mammalian intestinal cells and the gut microbiota.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 25 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarThree short stories about sex chromosomes Job Dekker, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USAHost: Yad Ghavi HelmThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: The 3D organization of the genome is critical for gene regulation. I will present three examples where sex chromosomes can serve as powerful models to study the folding of chromosomes in general, to identify cis-elements and proteins involved and to determine how chromosome organization and gene regulation are mechanistically linked.
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 19 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJennifer Doudna, Li Ka Shing Chancellor's Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences, Professor, Molecular & Cell Biology; Professor, Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USAHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo