Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 27 September 2016, 09:30Add to calendarTalking to cells via surface topography: from in vitro experiments to in silico modelsAurélie Carlier, MERLN Institute, Maastricht, NetherlandsHost: Wolfgang HuberDKFZ Main Auditorium, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Topographical cues have been shown to influence cell fate dramatically [1]. This phenomenon opens new opportunities to design the interaction between biomaterials and biological tissues in a predictable manner. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism of topographical control of cell behavior remains largely unknown. We have therefore established a high throughput screening platform of surface topography (the TopoChip), which consists of 2176 unique surfaces that are reproduced in an arrayed fashion on polymers using microfabrication techniques [2]. The 2176 topographical features were randomly selected from an in silico library of more than 150 million of topographies, which were based on combinations of simple geometric elements such as circles, triangles and rectangles. After cell seeding, we use quantitative high content imaging and machine learning algorithms to characterize the response of the cells to the thousands of different surfaces and learn more about the relation between surface topography and cell response. Previously, we have demonstrated that these surfaces significantly affect cell shape, including the roundness and size of the nucleus, as well as the perimeter and orientation of the cells [3]. Moreover, we have shown that these topographies can also be used to modulate the ALP expression in human mesenchymal stromal cells, as well as pluripotency in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In the future, we intend to further extend this data driven platform for materials design to test other biomaterial s characteristics as well as to develop advanced computational techniques to enhance our fundamental understanding of cell-biomaterial interactions.

[1] Bettinger et. al., 2009, Angewandte Chemie, 48.30 [2] Unadkat et al., 2011, PNAS, 16565 16570 [3] Hulsman et al., 2015, Acta Biomater, 29-38
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 27 September 2016, 15:15Add to calendarCharting the unknown: Oral drugs for novel targets beyond the rule of 5Jan Kihlberg, Uppsala University, Sweden, Department of Chemistry BMC, SwedenHost: Janosch HennigSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Structural Biology, Biocomputing, Chemistry and Chemical Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 4 October 2016, 15:00Add to calendarSpecific targeting of kinase catalytic and non-catalytic functionStefan Knapp, SGC Oxford, University of Frankfurt, GermanyHost: Carsten Schultz and Gerard DrewesSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 6 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarPostranscriptional regulation of gene expression in cardiac diseaseNorbert Huebner, MDC Berlin, GermanyHost: Lars SteinmetzSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 7 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTherapygenetics: Taking GxE interaction into the clinicThalia Eley, Professor of Developmental Behavioural Genetics, Department of Social Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Thursday, 13 October 2016, 15:00Add to calendarLab Coats in Hollywood: Scientists Impact on Cinema, Cinema s Influence on ScienceDavid A. Kirby, Centre for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Manchester, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: We are now in a golden age for science in popular culture. Academy Award winning films such as Gravity and The Theory of Everything, and television ratings titans like The Big Bang Theory have proven that science based popular cultural products can be both critically acclaimed and financially successful. But, the scientific community has long standing concerns about popular culture s impact on public attitudes towards science. In fact, there is significant empirical evidence showing that popular cultural products like movies can have a powerful influence on public perceptions of science. Anxiety over Hollywood science has led many scientists to become consultants for movie productions in order to influence how stories about science are told through this medium. In fact, many high profile scientific organizations including the US National Academy of Sciences and the Wellcome Trust in the UK have embraced movies as legitimate vehicles for science communication by developing initiatives to facilitate scientific involvement in the production of films. In this talk I will elaborate on the backstage role scientific experts play in negotiating information transfer between the scientific community and the entertainment community. I will also discuss the constraints filmmakers face when attempting to incorporate science into their film texts. In addition, I will explore the ways that movies made with the help of scientists have influenced science itself including how movies promote research agendas, stimulate technological development, and impact the cultural meanings of science.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 17 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarMolecular mechanisms mediating chromosome silencing by Xist RNANeil Brockdorff, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Tags: RNA
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 18 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCayetano Gonzalez, Barcelona Institute for Science and Technology, SpainHost: Anne EphrussiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 21 October 2016, 10:00Add to calendarThe First Steps in Vision: Cell types, Circuits and RepairBotond Roska, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical, Research, Basel, SwitzerlandHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 21 October 2016, 13:00Add to calendarValidating cryo-EM based atomic models using X-ray crystallography tools.Piotr Neumann , University of Goettingen, GermanyHost: Christian LöwSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: Recent developments in the field of single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) made it possible to obtain 3D reconstruction based atomic models. However in contrast to X-ray crystallography, the level of structural details is not as uniformly spread across the entire cryo-EM reconstruction, what causes the major difficulty in obtaining reliable atomic models for not well defined or flexible regions. This raises the need of developing new tools for multi-resolution fitting of atomic models and their validation or customization of the usage of existing programs.
Analysis of local Real Space Correlation Coefficient (RSCC) of over 200 near-atomic resolution structures deposited in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) revealed that only one third of those fit the deposited cryo-EM map at a level commonly accepted for large complexes determined at 3.8 2.8 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. In addition, post-processing, like sharpening of the 3D reconstruction, could significantly affect the level of reliable structural features if performed in a sub-optimal way.
The quality and interpretability of cryo-EM maps used for building models of large macromolecular complexes is usually estimated based on the gold-standard Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) criterion used to estimate the highest resolution limit of a 3D reconstruction. However using the same methodology to calculate FSC between cryo-EM map and the atomic model based map can be used to estimate to which resolution limit reliable structural features extend. The FCR methodology (Fourier Cross-Resolution) yields results that are in theory much less marred by the problems prevalent in FSC resolution estimation and could be used to estimate the highest resolution limit of a cryo-EM reconstruction.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 24 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedIlme Schlichting, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, GermanyHost: Francesco BisiakEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 28 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarFrom Vision to Decisions and Navigation in Mouse CortexMatteo Carandini, Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 28 October 2016, 11:00Add to calendarProteostasis,respiration and metabolism: a ménage à trois of cellular longevityAnita Krisko, Mediterranean Institute for Life Sciences, Split,Croatia, CroatiaHost: Theodore AlexandrovRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing, Proteomics, Structural Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 October 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMaria Molledo, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Christian LöwSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 7 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPeter Tompa, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Brussels, BelgiumHost: Danielle DesravinesEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 10 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedElena Taverna, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, GermanyHost: Anne EphrussiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 14 November 2016, 15:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEduardo Moreno, University Bern, SwitzerlandHost: Takashi HiiragiSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 24 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJames Sharpe, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), SpainHost: Marcus HeislerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 25 November 2016, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetics and Rett SyndromeAdrian Bird, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 25 November 2016, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedNassos Typas, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 28 November 2016, 18:00Add to calendarPersonalisiert & integrativ die Zukunft der PharmakologieGiulio Superti-Furga, CeMM Forschungszentrum für Molekulare Medizin der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, AustriaHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 30 November 2016, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPascal Bernard, Ecole Normale Superieure Lyon, FranceHost: Christian HaeringRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 1 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarStructural Basis of Gene Regulation by Polycomb Repressive Complex 2Xin Liu, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USAHost: Irene Garcia FerrerEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 2 December 2016, 14:00Add to calendarGlobal AMR: When two worlds collide Timothy Walsh, Cardiff University, United KingdomHost: Wiebke SchulzeILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 2 December 2016, 15:00Add to calendarThe prenatal sex steroid theory of autismSimon Baron-Cohen, Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Autism affects males more often than females. This is likely to be true even after taking into account under-diagnosis of females with Asperger Syndrome. One candidate biological mechanism for this is prenatal sex steroid hormones, that shape brain development, which themselves are under genetic control and have epigenetic properties. In this lecture I summarize work from our lab from 4 lines of evidence: (1) Testing if one sex steroid hormone, testosterone, measured in the womb is associated with individual differences in typical children s language and social development, attention to detail and narrow interests, autistic traits, and brain structure and function. (2) Testing if elevated prenatal sex steroid levels are associated with autism itself. (3) Testing if proxies of prenatal sex steroid levels in people with autism are also atypical. (4) Testing if post-natal sex steroid hormones in autism are elevated. These studies implicate a specific biological pathway (the Δ4 sex steroid pathway) as one important factor in the aetiology of autism. A recent animal model testing this theory is discussed, and the ethics of translating these findings is considered.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 16 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedClaire Wyart, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, , FranceHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 16 December 2016, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 12 January 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedKay Grünewald, Structural Biology & Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Manikandan KaruppasamyEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 10 February 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPeter Dayan, Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit, Sainsbury Wellcome Centre, 25 Howland Street, London W1T 4JG, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma
Abstract: Tags: Neurobiology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 21 February 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedNevan Krogan, University of California, USAHost: Balca Mardin/Benjamin LangThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 21 February 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Barford, MRC-LMB (Cambridge, United KingdomHost: Irina CornaciuEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 February 2017, 18:00Add to calendarWie Gliazellen zu Nervenzellen werden neue Ansätze zur Therapie nach GehirnverletzungenMagdalena Götz, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
Abstract: Das menschliche Gehirn kann abgestorbene Nervenzellen größtenteils nicht mehr ersetzen. Um dies zu ändern, untersuchen wir die Mechanismen, wie Nervenzellen während der Entwicklung gebildet werden, um dies dann auch im erwachsenen Gehirn nach Verletzung auslösen zu können. Tatsächlich werden Nervenzellen während der Entwicklung von radialen Gliazellen gebildet, einem Zelltyp der bislang nur als Stützzelle angesehen wurde. Diese Gliazellen gehen bei der Reifung des Säugergehirns verloren und differenzieren in andere Gliazellen aus. Dementsprechend geht auch die Fähigkeit zur Bildung neuer Nervenzellen in den meisten Gehirnregionen verloren, mit Ausnahme weniger Regionen, in welchen radiale Gliazellen erhalten bleiben, und tatsächlich zeitlebens noch neue Nervenzellen gebildet werden. In vielen anderen Wirbeltieren bleiben diese Gliazellen weitverbreitet erhalten (Barbosa et al., Science 2015), und Gehirnverletzungen können ohne Narbenbildung völlig geheilt werden (Baumgart et al., Glia 2010). Wir arbeiten daran zu verstehen, wie diese radialen Gliazellen Nervenzellen bilden, und wie wir die Bildung von Nervenzellen auch in den differenzierten Gliazellen des Säugergehirns wieder auslösen können (als Übersichtsartikel: Masserdotti et al., Development 2016). Diesbezüglich haben wir gerade in den letzten Jahren große Fortschritte gemacht und es gelingt uns nun, viele narbenbildende Gliazellen in reife Nervenzellen nach Gehirnverletzung im Mausmodell umzuwandeln (Gascon et al., Cell Stem Cell 2016). Zudem konnten wir zeigen, dass auch Gehirnregionen, in denen normalerweise keine neue Nervenzellen im Erwachsenenstadium gebildet werden, die Fähigkeit besitzen, neue Nervenzellen wieder passend in das Nervenzellnetzwerk zu integrieren und die Funktion der abgestorbenen Nervenzellen wieder zu ersetzen. Die große Frage ist nun, ob dies auch für lokal aus Gliazellen umgewandelte Nervenzellen möglich ist.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 21 March 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJürgen Knoblich, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, AustriaHost: Jan EllenbergThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 30 March 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedKay Diederich, University of Konstanz, GermanyHost: Irina CornaciuEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Science and Society
Friday, 7 April 2017, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBernd Pulverer, EMBO, GermanyHost: Erika Pellegrini ILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 24 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarNutritional Regulatory Networks Marian Walhout, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USAHost: Anne-Claude GavinThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Gene regulation and metabolism lie at the heart of most biological processes. Both are accomplished by complex networks harboring hundreds of nodes and thousands of edges. We study these networks and the interactions between them mainly in the nematode C. elegans, because it is amenable to high-throughput, large-scale genetics and genomics. In addition, we study interspecies network interactions between C. elegans and bacteria, that may help illuminate interactions between mammalian intestinal cells and the gut microbiota.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 25 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarThree short stories about sex chromosomes Job Dekker, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USAHost: Yad Ghavi HelmThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: The 3D organization of the genome is critical for gene regulation. I will present three examples where sex chromosomes can serve as powerful models to study the folding of chromosomes in general, to identify cis-elements and proteins involved and to determine how chromosome organization and gene regulation are mechanistically linked.
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 19 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJennifer Doudna, Li Ka Shing Chancellor's Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences, Professor, Molecular & Cell Biology; Professor, Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USAHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo