Seminar Colour Guide:              
Company Representative
Tuesday, 3 March 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar siPOOLs: complex and defined siRNA pools prevent off-target effects Michael Hannus, siTools, Germany Host: Beate Neumann
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: For years, RNAi was considered the magic bullet of functional genomics, promising fast, specific and scalable genetic intervention.

Hype was followed by disappointment when it was shown that off-target effects frequently dominate the phenotypic response in RNAi experiments. Nevertheless, RNAi remains the standard technique for gene inactivation because of its many advantages, such as transient, dose-dependent effects and ease of arrayed screening.

Complex siRNA pools apply a conceptually simple but efficient approach to prevent off-target effects: All siRNAs share the same on-target gene but have different off-target footprints. As a result, off-target effects are efficiently diluted and target gene knockdown becomes very robust.
http://www.sitoolsbiotech.com/

The talk is also open for non-EMBL members.
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Thursday, 5 March 2015, 16:00 Add to calendar Nanoscale dynamic organization of glutamate receptors impact on excitatory synapses function Daniel Choquet, Université de Bordeaux, France Host: Rainer Pepperkok
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 6 March 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar From stripes to blood flow: cardiovascular cell fates in the zebrafish Christian Mossimann, Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zürich, Switzerland Host: Francesca Peri
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Company Representative
Monday, 9 March 2015, 15:00 Add to calendar DEPArray: Image-based, semi-conductive cell sorting for isolation of single cells or pools of target cells Hans Peter Arnold, Silicon Biosystems, Germany Host: Alexis Perez Gonzalez
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Silicon Biosystems DEPArray enables the isolation of individual cells or pools of target cells. Cells are gently captured and moved on a semi-conductive chip consisting of 300,000 separately addressable electrodes in dielectric cages. Following the fluorescent signals of cells by labelling e.g. with specific dye-coupled antibodies and by bright field analysis, specific cells of interest can be identified and selected based on the microscopical images for automated recovery as pure single cells or pools of cells from heterogeneous samples.

The successful use of DEPArray has been demonstrated for the following applications which will be presented in this seminar:
- Targeted isolation of viable cells (e.g. stem cells) for downstream proliferation and differentiation in vitro from heterogeneous tissues and cell cultures.
- Isolation of rare cells like circulating tumour cells (for downstream genetic analysis, e.g. by aCGH or NGS)
- Targeted isolation of cell pools from heterogeneous samples, like tumour cells from disaggregated formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples (FFPE) to analyse tumour heterogeneity by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)

The microscopic inspection of cells prior to their selection for subsequent automated isolation as supported by DEPArray technology, allows the user to recover intact cells which are 100% pure and not associated with any contaminations like cell debris. DEPArray is currently the only commercially available system supporting the targeted manipulation and recovery of single cells or cell pools via di-electrophoresis (DEP) based on the use of a software-controlled semi-conductive chip.

Please find links to a video introducing into the DEPArray technology and to some pdf formatted application notes for DEPArray below.
Video: http://www.siliconbiosystems.com/deparray-technology
Application notes: http://www.siliconbiosystems.com/application-notes
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 11 March 2015, 16:00 Add to calendar "The vital role of biocuration in knowledge representation: (heads and) tales of SwissLipids."
Alan Bridge, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics Swiss-Prot group, Geneva, Switzerland Host: Anne-Claude Gavin
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing, Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 26 March 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar How to teach an old dog a new trick: Lateral growth initiation in the Arabidopsis stem. Thomas Greb, Ruprecht-Kalrs-Universität, Germany Host: Marcus Heisler
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Monday, 30 March 2015, 15:00 Add to calendar Crafting Stories About Science Ben Lillie, freelance writer and comedian, New York, USA Host: Halldór Stefánsson
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 14 April 2015, 10:21 Add to calendar Protein-RNA interactions and the origin of the genetic code Bojan Zagrovic, Max F. Perutz Laboratories & University of Vienna, Austria, Austria Host: Judith Zaugg
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Protein-RNA interactions and the origin of the genetic code

In spite of 50 years of effort, the origin of the universal genetic code remains poorly understood. Among different theories, the stereochemical hypothesis proposes that the code evolved as a consequence of direct interactions between amino acids and appropriate bases. If indeed true, such physicochemical foundation of the mRNA-protein relationship could potentially also lead to novel principles of RNA-protein interactions in general. Inspired by this promise, we have recently examined the relationship between the physicochemical properties of mRNAs and their cognate proteins at the proteome level. Using 1) experimentally and computationally derived interaction propensity scales capturing the behavior of amino acids in aqueous solutions of nucleobase analogs, 2) computationally derived binding free energies between individual nucleobases and aminoacid sidechain analogs in different solvents, and 3) knowledge-based interaction preferences of amino acids for different nucleobases, we have revealed a statistically significant matching between the composition of mRNA coding sequences and the base-binding preferences of their cognate protein sequences. Overall, our results redefine the stereo-chemical hypothesis concerning the origin of the genetic code and provide evidence of direct templating of proteins from mRNAs before the development of ribosomal decoding. Moreover, our findings support the possibility of direct complementary interactions between mRNAs and cognate proteins even in present-day cells, especially if both are unstructured, with implications extending to all facets of nucleic acid/protein biology.
Tags: Gene Regulation, Biocomputing, Structural Biology, Systems Biology, Evolution, RNA
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 17 April 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Stefano Piccolo, University of Padua, Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Italy Host: Darren Gilmour
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 21 April 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar The strength of protein coats deforming cell membranes Aurélien Roux, University of Geneva, Switzerland Host: Marko Kaksonen
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 22 April 2015, 14:00 Add to calendar To be announced Andreas Beyer, University of Cologne, Germany Host: Leopold Parts
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 April 2015, 15:00 Add to calendar The neuroscience of laughter Sophie Scott, University College London, United Kingdom Host: Halldór Stefánsson
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Wednesday, 29 April 2015, 18:00 Add to calendar Computer-Gehirn Interface Niels Birbaumer, University of Tuebingen, Germany Host: Halldór Stefánsson
all EMBL HD
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 30 April 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Caroline DEAN, John Innes Centre, Dept. of Cell & Developmental Biology, Norwich, UK, United Kingdom Host: Anne Ephrussi
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 5 May 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar Regulating chromosome-wide gene expression by nuclear positioning: dosage compensation in C. elegans Peter Meister, University of Bern, Institute of Cell Biology, Switzerland Host: Christian Haering
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 12 May 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Elly Tanaka, Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany Host: Anne Ephrussi
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 15 June 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced James E. Ferrell, Stanford University, Dept. of Chemical and Systems Biology, USA Host: Francois Nedelec
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 1 July 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Ilka Bischofs, Bioquant, University of Heidelberg, Germany Host: Kiran Patil
Room 202, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 2 July 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Adam Arkin, University of California, Berkeley, Dept. of Bioengineering, USA Host: Nassos Typas
ATC Auditorium, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Monday, 13 July 2015, 14:00 Add to calendar Decoding Race Catherine Bliss, University of California, San Francisco, USA Host: Halldór Stefánsson
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 16 September 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Thomas Pollard, Yale University, New Haven, Dept. of Molecular Cellular & Developmental Biology, USA Host: Peter Lenart
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Science and Society
Sunday, 20 September 2015, 14:00 Add to calendar EMBL Heidelberg Science & Society Symposium: What makes us human? Various speakers, MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology, Collège de France, University of Notre Dame Host: Halldór Stefánsson
The Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Humans are distinctly different from all the other animals, in ways both good and bad. But articulating what that difference consists of remains a complex and difficult task, tackled by biologists, anthropologists and brain scientists.

We are, presumably, the only known species with a mind set on unravelling who and what we are. Today, scientists are making use of genomics to realign H. Sapiens with respect to H. neanderthalensis, hominids and apes. But what are the assumptions that are built into these research projects? And what is the nature of the evolved cognitive faculties that allow people to relate and bond to one another in our species-specific way? Are some of our behavioral responses hardwired in neural networks as a result of our evolutionary history, or does the ultimate strength of the human species lie in its apparently unlimited neurological plasticity?

And while humans seem so fabulously well equipped to relate to one another and spin intricate webs of social relations, at the same time they tirelessly invent ways and means of destroying each other in warfare. Is such behaviour to be considered a part of our human nature? Globally speaking, what role do nature, culture and our social environment play in the crafting of humans?
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 22 September 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Christine Holt, University of Cambridge, Dept. of Developmental Neuroscience, United Kingdom Host: Jeroen Krijgsveld
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 30 September 2015, 16:00 Add to calendar To be announced Mary Beckerle, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, Host: Francois Nedelec
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 5 October 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Raymond E. Goldstein, University of Cambridge, Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Center for Mathematical Sciences, United Kingdom Host: Predocs
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 20 October 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Irving Weissman, Stanford University, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Standford Ludwig Center for Cancer Stem Cell Research and Medicine, USA Host: Lars Steinmetz
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 27 October 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Cynthia Wolberger, John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dept. of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Baltimore, USA Host: Christoph Mueller
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 16 November 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Herwig Baier, Max-Planck-Institute Martinsried, Dept. for Neurology, Germany Host: Francesca Peri
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 10 December 2015, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Marianne Bronner, California Institute of Technology, Division of Biology, Pasadena, USA Host: Detlev Arendt
Large Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 3 February 2016, 11:00 Add to calendar To be announced Ben Lehner, Centre for Genomic Regulation, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain Host: Kiran Paril
Small Operon, EMBL Heidelberg