Seminar Colour Guide:              
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 28 April 2017, 10:00Add to calendarSynaptic Processing of Visual Information in the RetinaLeon Lagnado, School of Life Sciences, , University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, United KingdomHost: Phil AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
Synapses are perhaps the most numerous computational elements within neural circuits. The process of chemical transmission can transform neural signals and, because synapses are plastic, these transformations can be altered over different time-scales to adjust the input-output relation of the circuit as a whole. I will describe experimental strategies that allow the synaptic basis of neural circuit function to be studied in vivo by imaging of genetically-encoded reporters. I will illustrate how these reporters can be used to analyze the synaptic processing of visual information in the retina of zebrafish. These strategies are revealing how the visual signal is first converted from an analogue format into spikes, as well as the synaptic changes that alter the input-output relation of the retinal circuit. In particular I will describe how plasticity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses can cause simultaneous increases and decreases in the gain of neural responses within distinct microcircuits of the inner retina. The general picture that emerges is one in which plasticity of synapses leads to dynamic changes in the encoding of visual stimuli.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 April 2017, 13:00Add to calendarLanthanide-binding nanobodies as experimental phasing tools for membrane proteins and protein complexesSophie Zimmermann, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Thomas R. SchneiderSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 5 May 2017, 13:00Add to calendarDissecting bacterial lifestyle with systems-based approachesNassos Typas, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: We work at the interface of systems biology and molecular mechanism. On one hand we develop and utilize high-throughput quantitative approaches that reveal functional interactions between genes at a whole cell level. On the other hand, we zoom into these networks to understand how different functional modules are interconnected, often at a detailed mechanistic level. Here I will present how we use such approaches to shed light into gene function and pathway organization, to understand the action of drugs and their interplay when combined, and to probe how protein machineries operate at the bacterial cell envelope- how they are organized, how they coordinate their actions and how the cell senses when they are malfunctioning. We have also recently moved our approaches to the host-pathogen interface and the dynamic microbial communities formed in our gut. Our main goals are to: a) elucidate pathways Salmonella uses to hijack its host machinery and b) to probe how gut microbial communities are formed, how they react to nutrition and pharmaceuticals, and how their composition and characteristics affects our health.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 11 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarThe regulation of excitability within sensory neurons and pain pathogenesis: from molecule to manDavid Bennett, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, UK, United KingdomHost: Paul HeppenstallCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of excessive excitability within sensory neurons. There has been significant progress over the last decade in understanding the molecular basis by which sensory neurons transduce and subsequently transmit noxious (ie. tissue damaging) stimuli giving rise to the sensation of pain. Over this same period we have recognized that mutations in such ion channels can result in primary pain disorders in humans providing great insight into the genetics of pain. An excellent example is the voltage gated ion channel NaV 1.7. Loss of function mutations in this ion channel result in congenital inability to experience pain and gain of function mutations can cause a number of distinct neuropathic pain disorders including erythromelalgia, paroxysmal extreme pain disorder and small fibre neuropathy. The fact that mutations in such channels can cause monogenic pain disorders makes them attractive analgesic drug targets and we are seeing a number of therapeutics being developed on this basis. Given that spontaneous activity is critical for the induction and maintenance of peripheral neuropathic pain we are now exploring techniques to reversibly silence sensory neurons. We have found that an engineered glutamate gated ion channel (which no longer responds to glutamate but is activated by Ivermectin) is very effective at electrically silencing sensory neurons both in vitro and in vivo. I will discuss how this can be used as a translational tool to reverse pain related hypersensitivity in animal models of neuropathic pain.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 12 May 2017, 10:00Add to calendarDNMT3A in Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Cancer and AgingMargaret Goodell, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA, USAHost: Philip Avner / Christophe LancrinCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3A) has recently emerged as an important tumor suppressor in hematologic malignancies, and its ablation in mouse hematopoietic stem cells inhibits differentiation. We will describe the use of DNMT3A knockout mice to study its role in myeloid and lymphoid malignancy development and its function in maintaining global DNA methylation. The role of DNMT3A mutations in intercellular competition in the context of aging will also be discussed.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 12 May 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedGregory Chirikjian , The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, USAHost: Thomas SchneiderSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
POSTPONED - Friday, 12 May 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAnne Tuukkanen, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 15 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announced Prof. Katrin Rittinger, The Francis Crick Institute, Molecular Structure of Cell Signalling Laboratory,London, United KingdomHost: Esther OrtegaEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 16 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarHead or tail - polarity in planarian regenerationJochen Rink, Max Planck Institute CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 19 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarIdentification of leukemia propagating genetic networks in primary human leukemic stem cellsCaroline Pabst, Heidelberg University, GermanyHost: Judith ZauggSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 19 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarStructural dynamics of the breast cancer genome in response to hormonesMiguel Beato, Gene Regulation, Stem Cells and Cancer Program , Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona , Spain, , SpainHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Eukaryotic cells decode environmental information via receptors and signalling networks that converge in the cell nucleus to adjust an integrated gene expression response. We study the response of breast cancer cells to the steroid hormones estrogens and progesterone (Pg) acting via their respective receptors (ER and PR, respectively) to decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms.

The precise organization in nucleosomes of the DNA sequences recognized by PR is a requisite for receptor binding and the initiation of chromatin remodelling leading to displacement of histones H1 and H2A/H2B. Remodelling depends on receptor-associated enzymes, including histone modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, as well as activated PARP1, which uses the NAD+ synthesized by NMNAT1 in the cell nucleus to synthesize large amounts of Poly-ADP-Ribose (PAR). These epigenetic processes are required for chromatin remodelling and the rapid regulation of thousand of genes leading ultimately to cell proliferation in response to hormone.

In addition to nucleosomes, higher levels of genome organization also participate in hormone action. The conserved partition of the genome in consecutive topological associating domains (TADs) contributes to coordination of the hormonal response. Hormone regulated genes tend to segregate into TADs that respond as a whole with either activation or repression of transcription. Genes in one TAD can be all activated by one hormone and all repressed by another hormone. Thus, TADs behave as regulons in the response of cells to external signals. High-resolution Hi-C data reveal the role of dominant enhancers in organizing the differential hormonal response within TADs.

The extensive chromatin remodelling observed in response to hormones requires the transient accumulation in the cell nucleus of large amounts of PAR, which is subsequently degraded to ADPR. A fraction of this ADPR is converted to ATP in the nucleus by NUDIX5 in the presence of PPi. NUDIX5 is a homodimer known to catalyse the hydrolysis of ADPR to AMP and R-5-P, but in response to hormone NUDIX5 is dephosphorylated at T45, leading to a conformational change of the homodimer that enables it to catalyse the reaction of ADPR with PPi to generate ATP and R-5-P. The ATP generated in the cell nucleus is essential for chromatin remodelling and gene regulation by estrogens or progesterone, as well as for DNA damage repair. NUDIX5 is overexpressed in breast cancers and is a marker for poor prognosis. Thus, it represents a novel target for breast cancer management.

Science and Society
Monday, 22 May 2017, 18:00Add to calendarMenschliche Gehirne aus dem Labor Fortschritte und Grenzen der modernen StammzellforschungJürgen Knoblich, Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie, Wien, AustriaHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
Abstract: Moderne Methoden der Stammzellforschung haben ein enormes Potenzial für die Erforschung und Therapie menschlicher Krankheiten.
Gleichzeitig lösen die enormen Möglichkeiten der Rekonstruktion und Veränderung menschlichen Lebens berechtigte Befürchtungen aus und Rufe nach der Beschränkung und Regulierung der Biowissenschaften werden laut. In diesem Vortrag werden die modernen Möglichkeiten der Stammzellforschung umrissen. Was versteht man unter dem Begriff Stammzelle? Warum sind Stammzellen so vielversprechend? Und wo sollen die Grenzen für diese Methodik gesetzt werden?
Insbesondere wird der Vortragende, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Knoblich, auf die Forschung mit sogenannten Organoiden eingehen. Seinem Labor ist es 2013 gelungen aus menschlichen Stammzellen eine Gewebekultur herzustellen, die dem menschlichen Gehirn auf überraschende Weise ähnelt. Sowohl die dreidimensionale Struktur als auch die Zusammensetzung aus verschiedenen Typen von Nervenzellen und deren aktive Kommunikation werden in dem Modell sehr präzise nachgebildet. Nachdem diese Kulturen im Prinzip aus den Zellen von jedem Patienten hergestellt werden können, haben sie enormes Potenzial für die Erforschung von Krankheiten, die Erprobung von Medikamenten und die Einsparung von Tierversuchen.
Die Arbeiten von Prof. Dr. Knoblich sind Teil eines neuen Forschungsfeldes in dem mit Hilfe sogenannter Organoide menschliche Organe und Gewebe im Labor hergestellt werden. Mittlerweile ist das bereits für Darm, Magen, Bauchspeicheldrüse, Auge und verschiedene Teile des Gehirns gelungen, so dass diese neue Methodik bereits für die Erprobung von Medikamenten eingesetzt werden kann. Der Vortrag wird einen Einblick in dieses faszinierende neue Forschungsgebiet geben. Er wird sein Potenzial ausloten, den Stand der Forschung beleuchten aber auch auf die damit - und mit der Stammzellforschung generell - verbundenen ethischen Problematiken eingehen.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 26 May 2017, 10:00Add to calendarThe social brain in adolescenceSarah-Jayne Blakemore, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, London, UK, , United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: This talk focuses on how the social brain, that is the network of brain regions involved in understanding others, develops during adolescence. Social cognitive processes involved in navigating an increasingly complex social world continue to develop throughout human adolescence. Areas of the social brain undergo significant reorganisation in terms of structure and function during the second decade of life, which possibly reflects a sensitive period for adapting to the social environment. The changes in social environment that occur during adolescence interact with increasing executive functions, heightened social sensitivity and the developing social brain to influence a number of adolescent behaviours, including risk-taking, peer influence and self-consciousness.
Tags: Neurobiology
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 29 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarDiscovery of Hybrid Peptides in Autoimmune DiseaseThomas Delong, UC Denver, USAHost: Lars VeltenSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: A central question driving type 1 diabetes (T1D) research is why the pancreatic beta cell is singled out for destruction by the immune system. Abnormal post-translational protein modifications leading to the alteration of self-proteins have been shown to play a central role in various autoimmune diseases and could provide a plausible explanation why the insulin producing beta cells are targeted by autoreactive T cells leading to the development of T1D. We used CD4 T cell clones that were isolated either from the residual islets of T1D patients, or from diabetic NOD mice to investigate antigens for autoreactive T cells. We show that T cells from both groups react to peptides that are formed upon covalent crosslinking of specific insulin C-Peptide fragments to naturally occurring peptide cleavage products of proteins such as chromogranin A, islet amyloid polypeptide, or neuropeptide Y. These hybrid insulin peptides (HIPs) are extremely antigenic for the T cells and we provide direct physical evidence through mass spectrometry that HIPs are formed in murine beta cells. The demonstration that these modified peptides exist and that pathogenic T cells target them provides a logical and highly novel explanation of how immune tolerance may be broken in T1D.
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 29 May 2017, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedOlivier Duss, The Scripps Research Institute, USAHost: Janosch HennigSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biophysics, Cell Biology, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Gene Regulation, RNA, Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 30 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedStefania Castagnetti, Marine Station Villefranche sur Mer, Nice, FranceHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 9 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAlberto Bacci, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière ICM (Brain & Spine Institute), Paris, FranceHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Friday, 9 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendarDo microbes control the mind? Issues in brain, gut and microbiota researchMaureen O'Malley, University of Bordeaux, FranceHost: Rob MeijersSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: Microbiota research uses a sequencing-based approach to examine the composition and function of microbial communities in specific niches. Some of the most intensive research in this area has been carried out on the gut microbiota of animals, particularly humans and mice. Many associations have been made between microbiota composition and various health or disease states. A rapidly expanding area of investigation is concerned with the connections between animal gut microbiota, the enteric nervous system, and various brain and behavioural states. Links have been made between microbiota composition and disorders such as autism, anxiety and depression. Microbiota even seem to influence general cognition and memory. Many strong interpretations have been made of these findings, including claims that microbiota control animal behaviour in the manner of puppeteers controlling puppets. I will examine these claims in the context of a variety of problems in microbiota research methodology and what they can say about causality.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 12 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarHuman-specific genes and neural stem cell amplification and neocortex expansion in development and human evolutionWieland Huttner, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract:
Our group studies neural stem and progenitor cells in the context of the expansion of the neocortex in development and evolution. Two major classes of cortical stem/progenitor cells can be distinguished. First, stem/progenitor cells that reside in the ventricular zone (VZ), i.e. neuroepithelial cells, apical radial glia (aRG) and apical intermediate progenitors, collectively referred to as apical progenitors (APs). Second, stem/progenitor cells that reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ), i.e. basal radial glia (bRG) and basal intermediate progenitors, collectively referred to as basal progenitors (BPs). Neocortex expansion is thought to be linked to an increased abundance and proliferative capacity of BPs.
To gain insight into the genomic changes that underlie neocortex expansion, notably in humans, we have analyzed the transcriptomes of human vs. mouse VZ and SVZ, and of human vs. mouse aRG and bRG. This led to the identification of the human-specific gene ARHGAP11B as a major player. Specifically, ARHGAP11B promotes the generation of BPs from aRG and the subsequent BP proliferation, thereby increasing BP abundance. Moreover, ARHGAP11B is able to induce folding of the embryonic mouse neocortex, which normally is smooth. The ability of ARHGAP11B to amplify BPs is based on a single C-to-G base substitution which creates a novel splice donor site; this leads to the removal of 55 nucleotides upon mRNA splicing, resulting in a reading frame shift and generating a human-specific 47-amino acid sequence that is thought to be key for BP amplification.
To compare neural stem cell division between human and great ape developing neocortex, we have performed live imaging using iPSC-derived 3D cerebral organoids. This revealed a specific lengthening of metaphase during AP mitosis in human as compared to chimpanzee and orangutan. The potential implications of this metaphase lengthening will be discussed.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 12 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendar"The structure of the nuclear pore complex"Andre Hoelz, Howard Hughes Medical Institute & Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology, USAHost: Edward LemkeSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology, Biophysics, Structural Biology, Systems Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 16 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedClement Blanchet, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Tuesday, 20 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendarCatastrophic Thinking: Extinction and the Value of DiversityDavid Sepkoski, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Why do we care about preserving biodiversity? At the beginning of the 21st century biodiversity has come to be seen as an intrinsic scientific and cultural value. In other words, biological diversity the sheer multiplicity and heterogeneity of living things is now understood to have an inherent value that is not reducible to the utilitarian or aesthetic worth of any particular individual species: the value of diversity is diversity itself. Extinction plays a central role in this understanding of biodiversity, since diversity is something that is understood to be fragile and tenuous, constantly endangered by the threat of loss. Whereas most historians who have examined this phenomenon have placed the modern biodiversity movement in the context of a history of conservation biology and endangered species protection, I want to frame it in a new perspective. This talk will examine the influence of biological theories about the nature and dynamics of extinction and especially mass extinction on the current valuation of biological diversity. I will focus particularly on the ways that new understandings of extinction in the past for example, the extinction of the dinosaurs have converged with scientific and cultural anxieties about the present the specters of global warming, nuclear war, and biodiversity loss. I will argue that this new model of extinction has played a prominent conceptual and rhetorical role in debates surrounding the current biodiversity crisis, which I will examine in critical historical perspective.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 23 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedIva Pichová, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech RepublicSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 27 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMaria Carmo-Fonseca , University of Lisbon, PortugalHost: Isabel Chillon EMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 6 July 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedOlivier Pourquié, Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics/The Brigham and Women s Hospital, USAHost: Alexander AulehlaThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 7 July 2017, 13:00Add to calendarSmall angle scattering data and model validation at SASBDBAl Kikhney, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 July 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAnne-sophie Huart, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 2 August 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEndogenous chromosomal lesions: How cells deal with unavoidable DNA damageJiri Lukas, University of Copenhagen, DenmarkHost: Yannick Schwab/Beate NeumannSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 14 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedGene Myers, MPI-CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 15 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedYonca Ural-Blimke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 18 September 2017, 15:00Add to calendarThe Ethics of Biomedical Big Data: Between individual and public health interestsBrent Mittelstadt, University of Oxford, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 28 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMiho Nakajima, The Neuroscience Institute Depts. of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Physiology NYU, Langone Medical Center, USAHost: Hiroki AsariCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Friday, 29 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedHelga Nowotny, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, SwitzerlandHost: Halldór Stefánsson CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 2 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEdward Lemke, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Francesco BisiakEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 6 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarSwitching genes on and off during erythropoiesisDouglas Higgs, MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Christophe LancrinCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 13 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAlla Karpova, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Virginia, USA, USAHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 20 October 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCy Jeffries, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 3 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetic variation and non-genetic inheritanceAnne Ferguson-Smith, Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge , UK, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 9 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBing Ren, University of California, USAHost: Jan KorbelThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Baker, University of Washington, USAHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 17 November 2017, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenetic mechanisms in early mammalian developmentMaria Elena Torres-Padilla, Institute of Epigenetics and Stem Cells (IES) , Helmholtz Zentrum München, GermanyHost: Philip Avner CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 24 November 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDaniel Franke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 1 December 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedSpyros Chatziefthimiou, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 4 December 2017, 15:00Add to calendarImprobable Research and the Ig Nobel PrizesMarc Abrahams, Ig Nobel Prize, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 12 January 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo