Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 2 September 2019, 10:30Add to calendarMolecular control of meiotic chromosome dynamics
Yumi Kim, Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, USAHost: Simone KoehlerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 5 September 2019, 11:00Add to calendarX-ray holography to image dense neural networks in large tissue volumesAlexandra Pacureanu, The European Synchrotron, University College London and The Francis Crick Institute, FranceHost: Yannick SchwabSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Function of the nervous system emerges from interactions between cells forming densely intertwined, connected structures. Since visualizing neurites requires nanometer scale resolution and each neural circuit can span over millimeters of tissue volumes, exploring and understanding the inner workings of neural networks remains a highly challenging and costly endeavor. Today, the largest brain imaged entirely with sufficient spatial resolution corresponds to a fruit fly and this is the result of an exceptional effort. Electron microscopy is the only technique offering the necessary resolving power but covering large volumes requires ultrathin sectioning followed by imaging, alignment and stitching of millions of images.
High energy X-rays have sub-nanometer wavelength and high penetration power, making them an attractive illumination probe for nanometer imaging of millimeter thick samples. In practice, the spatial resolution has been limited to micrometer level and the X-ray attenuation contrast for soft biological tissues is very weak. I will present an X-ray phase contrast technique, called holography, which enables imaging with exceptional spatial resolution and contrast by using a highly focused and coherent beam. By combining X-ray holography with cryogenic imaging and tomographic reconstruction, we have obtained 3D images of both Drosophila and mouse neural tissue of adequate quality for tracing dense neuronal morphologies in mm sized volumes. Furthermore, we have adapted a 3D U-NET convolutional neural network to accelerate tracing through automatic segmentation. I will discuss future perspective of using X-ray imaging to explore neural tissue and the research avenues opened by this approach.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 5 September 2019, 14:30Add to calendarSuper-resolution microscopy of lipid droplet metabolism in living cells with red-shifted ground state dimers of conventional BODIPY conjugateElias Puchner, University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, USAHost: Alba Diz-MuñozRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Science and Society
Thursday, 12 September 2019, 14:00Add to calendarEthics Dumping How to avoid 21st century exploitation in research
Doris Schroeder, Centre for Professional Ethics, UCLan UK and Law School, UCLan Cyprus, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Never before has so much research been undertaken globally. The mobility of researchers is seen as a must in career trajectories today. Whilst this international outlook on research has produced many benefits for humankind, it has also led to a new phenomenon of exploitation: ethics dumping; the export of unethical practices from high-income settings to countries with less restrictive regulatory regimes.

This presentation will explain what ethics dumping is, present concrete cases and most importantly explain how it can be avoided. It will introduce the Global Code of Conduct for Research in Resource-Poor Settings, which is now mandatory for EU-funding involving low- or middle-income countries. The code is based on an innovative moral framework around fairness, respect, care and honesty, which was built by a global group from all continents, importantly involving representatives of vulnerable populations (sex workers from Nairobi and indigenous peoples from the Kalahari).
Science and Society
CANCELLED - Monday, 16 September 2019, 15:00Add to calendarHerding Scientists - A Problem or A Solution?Michelle Baddeley, University of South Australia, AustraliaHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 17 September 2019, 11:00Add to calendarOrganizing behavior across timescalesCornelia Isabella Bargmann, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, The Rockefeller University, Lulu and Anthony Wang Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior, , USAHost: Christine HoLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Genes, neurons, and circuits encode information, interpret it based on context and motivational states, and use that combined input to drive flexible behaviors. Understanding how these processes propagate across temporal and spatial scales is daunting in the complex human brain, but more straightforward in the simple brain of the nematode C. elegans. Our studies of C. elegans foraging behaviors have provided insights into three levels of behavioral regulation: the gating of information flow by circuit state over seconds, the extrasynaptic regulation of circuits by neuropeptides and neuromodulators over minutes and hours, and innate programs that modify behavior across development. The last few minutes of the talk will be about supporting technology and collaboration in science as a way to accelerate scientific progress.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 26 September 2019, 11:00Add to calendarTHE MOLECULAR MACHINERY OF INTRACELLULAR PROTEIN DEGRADATION: STRUCTURAL STUDIES EX SITU AND IN SITUWolfgang Baumeister, Max Planc Institute of Biochemistry, GermanyHost: Julia Mahamid, Martin BeckLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway for the controlled degradation of intracellular proteins. The 2.5 MDa complex comprises two subcomplexes: the 20S core where proteolysis takes place and one or two regulatory particles which prepare substrates for degradation. Whereas the structure of its 20S core particle has been determined by X-ray crystallography more than two decades ago, the structure of the regulatory particle, which recruits substrates, unfolds them, and assists in their translocation into the core particle remained elusive for a long time. Only in recent years has its structure been determined to high resolution using cryo-electron microscopy single particle analysis.

Cryo-electron tomography allows to perform structural studies of macromolecular and supramolecular structures in situ, i.e. in their functional cellular environments. We used this method to study the 26S proteasome in a number of cellular settings revealing their precise location, assembly and activity status as well as their interactions with other molecular players of the cellular degradation machinery.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 11 October 2019, 14:30Add to calendarAtomic Structures of Vaccinia DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complexes: The Mechanism of Poxvirus Transcription
Clemens Grimm, Institut für Biochemie, Biozentrum der Universitaet Wuerzburg Am Hubland, , GermanyHost: Christoph MuellerSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biocomputing, Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 24 October 2019, 10:30Add to calendarTo be announcedShiladitya Banerjee, UCL Department of Physics & Astronomy , Faculty of Maths & Physical Sciences, United KingdomHost: Alba Diz-MuñozSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 24 October 2019, 15:00Add to calendarTo be announcedItai Yanai, New York University, School of Medicine, USAHost: Theodore AlexandrovLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Tuesday, 19 November 2019, 15:00Add to calendarImaging human embryos: A history
Nick Hopwood, University of Cambridge, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 21 November 2019, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedPascale Cossart, Pasteur Institute, FranceLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg