Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 27 July 2017, 10:00Add to calendarTranscriptomic deconvolution of heterogeneous tumor samples Wenyi Wang, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, USAHost: Jan KorbelSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Tumor tissue samples are comprised of a mixture of cancerous and surrounding stromal cells. Understanding tumor heterogeneity is crucial to analyzing gene signatures associated with cancer prognosis and treatment decisions. Compared with the experimental approach of laser capture micro-dissection to isolate different tissue components, in silico dissection of mixed cell samples is faster and cheaper. Numerous computational approaches previously developed all have their limitations to deconvolute heterogeneous tumor samples. In this talk, I will present a new three-component deconvolution model, DeMixT, that can account for the immune cell compartment explicitly and is able to address the challenging problem when the observed signals are assumed to come from a mixture of three cell compartments, infiltrated immune cells, tumor microenvironment and cancerous tissues.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 27 July 2017, 11:00Add to calendarSignaling to and from the Secretory Pathway in the regulation of Cell Growth and ProteostasisHesso Farhan, University of Oslo, NorwayHost: Rainer PepperkokRoom 13-518 a + b, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 28 July 2017, 10:00Add to calendarNews in SMLM methods: Less phototoxic sptPALM imaging of
living cells and dense fluorophore labeling without compromising the
biological target
Ulrike Endersfelder, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, GermanyHost: Jonas RiesSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 2 August 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEndogenous chromosomal lesions: How cells deal with unavoidable DNA damageJiri Lukas, University of Copenhagen, DenmarkHost: Yannick Schwab/Beate NeumannSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Wednesday, 6 September 2017, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedLorena Benedetti, Yale University School of Medicine, USAHost: Jan EllenbergSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 14 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedGene Myers, MPI-CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Monday, 18 September 2017, 15:00Add to calendarThe Ethics of Biomedical Big Data: Between individual and public health interestsBrent Mittelstadt, University of Oxford, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 2 October 2017, 10:30Add to calendarTo be announcedMeghan Driscoll, UT Southwestern Medical Center, USAHost: Jan EllenbergSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 9 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarAutoimmune priming, tissue attack and chronic inflammation the three stages of an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritisRikard Holmdahl, Karolinska Institute, SwedenHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Extensive genome wide association studies have recently shed some light on the causes of chronic autoimmune diseases and have confirmed a central role of the adaptive immune system. Moreover, better diagnostics using disease-associated autoantibodies have been developed, and treatment has improved through the development of biologicals with precise molecular targets.
Here, I will discuss rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease to propose that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases could be divided into three discrete stages. First, yet unknown environmental challenges seem to activate innate immunity thereby providing an adjuvant signal for the induction of adaptive immune responses that lead to the production of autoantibodies and determine the subsequent disease development. Second, a joint-specific inflammatory reaction occurs. This inflammatory reaction might be clinically diagnosed as the earliest signs of the disease. Third, inflammation is converted to a chronic process leading to tissue destruction and remodeling. I will discuss the stages involved in RA pathogenesis and the experimental approaches, mainly involving animal models that can be used to investigate each disease stage. In particular I will focus on the tissue attack and how this could be prevented. Although the focus is on RA, it is likely that a similar stepwise development of disease also occurs in other chronic autoimmune settings such as multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 9 October 2017, 14:00Add to calendartbdThomas Dobner, HPI HAMBURG, GermanyHost: Kiran PatilSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology, Gene Regulation, RNA, Systems Biology
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 9 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBing Ren, University of California, USAHost: Jan KorbelThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Baker, University of Washington, USAHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Science and Society
Monday, 4 December 2017, 15:00Add to calendarImprobable Research and the Ig Nobel PrizesMarc Abrahams, Ig Nobel Prize, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg