Seminar Colour Guide:              
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Friday, 25 August 2017, 11:00Add to calendarPushing the limits: super-resolution microscopy at high throughput, independent of the coverslip, and with low-cost detectorsRobin Diekmann, University of Bielefeld, Faculty of Physics, GermanyHost: Jonas RiesSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Wednesday, 6 September 2017, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedLorena Benedetti, Yale University School of Medicine, USAHost: Jan EllenbergSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 8 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarNew mechanism of programmed cell death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a NAD(P)+ hydrolyzing toxinDiana Freire, EMBL, Hamburg Unit, GermanyHost: Annabel ParretSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 14 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarComputational Optics and Bioimage InformaticsGene Myers, MPI-CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 15 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarStructure and function of a peptide transporter from E. coli

Yonca Ural-Blimke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Monday, 18 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarLinking Structure to the Biological Function in Cell Fate Determination

Fumiaki Yumoto, KEK Photon Factory in Tsukuba, JapanHost: Arjen JakobiSeminar Room 48e
Science and Society
Monday, 18 September 2017, 15:00Add to calendarThe Ethics of Biomedical Big Data: Between individual and public health interestsBrent Mittelstadt, University of Oxford, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Wednesday, 27 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarLinking Structural Biology to Vaccine DesignMartino Bolognesi, Department of Biosciences, University of Milano, ItalyHost: Thomas R. SchneiderSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 28 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarPrefrontal cortex controls sensory filtering through a basal ganglia-to-thalamus pathwayMiho Nakajima, The Neuroscience Institute Depts. of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Physiology NYU, Langone Medical Center, NY, USA, USAHost: Hiroki AsariCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract: Broad filtering of irrelevant inputs is essential for extracting relevant sensory information from noisy environments. This filtering can involve input-dependent (bottom up) or internally guided (top down) operations, but the computational principles and circuit implementation of these processes are unclear. Here we find that the auditory thalamic reticular nucleus (audTRN) regulates sensory thalamic responses through divisive normalization, a process required for broad filtering within a given modality. Employing a combination of anatomical tracing and functional readouts, we identify a top down control signal from the PFC to the audTRN conveyed through basal ganglia. This control results in a subtractive effect on thalamic sensory responses that enhances signal to noise ratio and improves sensory discrimination behavior under noisy conditions. Using this insight, we develop a strategy to target attentional deficits in a model of human neurodevelopmental disease, Ptchd1 KO, where TRN function is impaired. Specifically, by combining a pharmacological method that enhances normalization with top down engagement of subtractive control, we restored behavioral performance nearly to WT level. Overall, the discovery that basal ganglia circuits convey the control signal from PFC allowed us to both determine how top down inputs interact with bottom up normalization, and to identify novel circuit nodes of intervention for disease correction.
Science and Society
Friday, 29 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarWorking Together but how? Scientific collaboration in a globalised worldHelga Nowotny, ETH Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Halldór StefánssonCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract: Collaboration is in. So are networks and sharing, open science and open access. Global student mobility is at unprecedented levels and so is globally distributed scientific work. Humanity faces enormous challenges that can only be tackled by large-scale, cross-national efforts of collaboration and coordination. Meanwhile, the unrelenting generation of ever more data, waiting to be curated and processed, made interoperable and translated into tangible benefits, continues to transform the organisation of scientific practice and how to manage scientific institutions.

The younger generation of researchers finds itself caught in the ensuing turbulence. The geographical-spatial extension of research is accompanied by a tighter temporal grip exerted locally. Standardisation of career paths favours mainstream thinking while failure, creativity and diversity are celebrated as desirable ideals at the same time. Expectations of being adept at multi-tasking abound while the focus on the tasks ahead becomes more narrow. How to survive such contradictions? How to embrace the uncertainty that comes with it?

I will attempt to discuss how greater reflexive awareness of the enablement and constraints that come with the current transformation can help to better understand the different imaginaries of what working together might mean and entail.
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 2 October 2017, 10:30Add to calendarTo be announcedMeghan Driscoll, UT Southwestern Medical Center, USAHost: Jan EllenbergSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 2 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEdward Lemke, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Francesco BisiakEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 4 October 2017, 15:00Add to calendarOpen Talk: Research Ethics and Publishing Bernd Pulverer, EMBO, GermanyHost: Toby GibsonSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Developmental Biology and Differentiation, Cell Regulation and Signaling, Cell Biology, Biological Networks, Gene Regulation, Imaging and Image Analysis, Neurobiology, Biocomputing, Structural Biology, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Systems Biology, Molecular Medicine, Evolution, Biophysics, Plant Biology, Proteomics, RNA, Engineering
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 6 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarSwitching genes on and off during erythropoiesisDouglas Higgs, MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Christophe LancrinCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 9 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarAutoimmune priming, tissue attack and chronic inflammation the three stages of an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritisRikard Holmdahl, Karolinska Institute, SwedenHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Extensive genome wide association studies have recently shed some light on the causes of chronic autoimmune diseases and have confirmed a central role of the adaptive immune system. Moreover, better diagnostics using disease-associated autoantibodies have been developed, and treatment has improved through the development of biologicals with precise molecular targets.
Here, I will discuss rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease to propose that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases could be divided into three discrete stages. First, yet unknown environmental challenges seem to activate innate immunity thereby providing an adjuvant signal for the induction of adaptive immune responses that lead to the production of autoantibodies and determine the subsequent disease development. Second, a joint-specific inflammatory reaction occurs. This inflammatory reaction might be clinically diagnosed as the earliest signs of the disease. Third, inflammation is converted to a chronic process leading to tissue destruction and remodeling. I will discuss the stages involved in RA pathogenesis and the experimental approaches, mainly involving animal models that can be used to investigate each disease stage. In particular I will focus on the tissue attack and how this could be prevented. Although the focus is on RA, it is likely that a similar stepwise development of disease also occurs in other chronic autoimmune settings such as multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 9 October 2017, 14:00Add to calendartbdThomas Dobner, HPI HAMBURG, GermanyHost: Kiran PatilSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology, Gene Regulation, RNA, Systems Biology
Science and Society
Friday, 13 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedProf. Roberto Burioni, The San Raffaele Hospital, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, ItalyHost: Erika Pellegrini & Halldor StefanssonILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
POSTPONED - Friday, 13 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAlla Karpova, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Virginia, USA, USAHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Friday, 20 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarAdhesive fimbriae of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria: mechanisms of assembly and receptor recognitionNatalia Pakharukova, University of Turku, FinlandHost: Martin BeckRoom 202, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 20 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDr. Christopher Lima , MSKCC New York, USAHost: Wojtek GalejEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 20 October 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCy Jeffries, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Thursday, 26 October 2017, 15:00Add to calendarRNA polymerase and the ribosome: A snapshot of the central dogma of molecular biologyRebecca Kohler, Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Muenchen, GermanyHost: Martin BeckSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Gene Regulation, Structural Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Wednesday, 1 November 2017, 13:00Add to calendarStress-induced biocrystallization in bacteriaYurii Krupyanskii, Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences., Russian FederationHost: Dmitri SvergunSeminar Room 48e
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 3 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetic variation and non-genetic inheritanceAnne Ferguson-Smith, Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge , UK, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 7 November 2017, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJoost Gribnau, Erasmus MC - dept of Developmental Biology,, Rotterdam, NetherlandsHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 9 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBing Ren, University of California, USAHost: Jan KorbelThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 10 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarRegulation and Heterogeneity of Dormant Hematopoietic Stem CellsNina Cabezas-Wallscheid, Max-Planck-Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Freiburg, Germany, GermanyHost: Christophe Lancrin CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract: Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) harbor the capacity to generate a series of multipotent progenitors (MPPs) that differentiate into lineage-committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. To explore essential HSC features, we recently integrated quantitative proteome, transcriptome, and methylome analyses of five FACS-sorted HSCs and MPP populations (MPP1-4) and combined these OMICs analyses to their functional potential (Cabezas-Wallscheid et al., Cell Stem Cell 2014; Klimmeck et al., Stem Cell Reports 2014; Lipka et al., Cell Cycle 2014). From the characterization of more than 6,000 proteins, 27,000 transcripts, and 15,000 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), we identified coordinated changes associated with early differentiation steps. DMRs show continuous gain or loss of methylation during differentiation, and the overall change in DNA methylation correlates inversely with gene expression at key loci. Our data reveal the differential expression landscape of 493 TFs and 682 lncRNAs and highlight specific expression clusters including Wnt and Lin28-Hmga signaling, the imprinted-gene-network, Hox genes, retinoic acid metabolism. We also found an unexpectedly dynamic pattern of transcript isoform regulation, suggesting a critical regulatory role during HSC differentiation, and a cell cycle/DNA repair signature associated with multipotency in MPP2 cells. To address differentiation potential of MPP2-4 we linked our OMICs data with functional reconstitution experiments.
Recently, we have expanded this analysis to dormant HSCs (dHSCs) identified by label-retaining assays (Wilson et al., Cell 2008). Rare dHSCs reside at the top of the blood hierarchy harboring the highest long-term reconstitution capacity. However, till the date the molecular identity of dHSCs, as well as the mechanism regulating maintenance and the transition out of dormancy remain unknown. We now show by single-cell RNA-seq analysis that the transition from dormancy towards cell cycle entry is achieved by a continuous and coordinated up-regulation of all major biosynthetic processes rather than a switch on/off mechanism (Cabezas-Wallscheid et al. Cell 2007). We employed a novel transgenic reporter mouse model that reversibly marks dHSCs avoiding label retention assays. Finally, we show that dietary vitamin A/ retinoic acid signaling is a key pathway for in vivo retaining HSC dormancy.

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Baker, University of Washington, USAHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 17 November 2017, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenetic mechanisms in early mammalian developmentMaria Elena Torres-Padilla, Institute of Epigenetics and Stem Cells (IES) , Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany, GermanyHost: Philip Avner CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract:
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 17 November 2017, 15:04Add to calendarto be definedPhilipp Hornburg, EMBL,Hamburg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 24 November 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDaniel Franke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 1 December 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedSpyros Chatziefthimiou, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 4 December 2017, 15:00Add to calendarImprobable Research and the Ig Nobel PrizesMarc Abrahams, Ig Nobel Prize, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 11 December 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDéborah Bourc'his , Institut Curie, Unité de Génétique et Biologie du Développement, Paris, FranceHost: Jamie HackettCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract:
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 13 December 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedFrancois Schweisguth, Institut Pasteur, FranceHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 11 January 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announced Prof. Nenad Ban, ETH, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Irina CornaciuEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 12 January 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Rome
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 5 February 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDr. Elena Seiradake , University of Oxford, United KingdomHost: Valentina SperanziniEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 22 February 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedProf. Anna Pyle , Yale University, USAHost: Isabel Chillon and Almudena Ponce Salvatierra EMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 23 February 2018, 11:00Add to calendarZebrafish colour vision: Rainbows in the eyesTom Baden, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, United KingdomHost: Hiroki AsariCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract: All sensory systems are specialised to efficiently provide information critical within an animal's sensory-ecological niche. In vertebrate vision, the retina of all visual species follows a common set anatomical and functional motifs, yet each species has tweaked details in this network to tune its vision for its natural visual environment. Accordingly, comparing functional processing strategies employed in different species that live in different visual envioronments provides a window into how neuronal networks evolve to better suit novel computational demands. In reference to our existing functional database on the retina of mice, we now study the retina of zebrafish in the context of their natural habitat to address these questions with a particular emphasis on colour vision.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 9 March 2018, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedFrancisco Bezanilla, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAHost: Paul HeppenstallCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Science and Society
Friday, 16 March 2018, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedProf. Bruno Strasser, Geneva University, SwitzerlandHost: Erika Pellegrini & Halldor StefanssonChadwick Amphitheatre, Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 6 April 2018, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenomic Signatures of Neuronal Diversity in the Mammalian BrainJoseph Ecker, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, USAHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract: DNA methylation is a chemical modification that occurs predominantly on CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. However, recent studies from our laboratory have revealed that non-CG methylation (mCH) is more abundant than CG methylation and non-randomly distributed in the genomes of brain cells. mCH accumulates during the establishment of neural circuits and is associated with Rett syndrome. A comprehensive understanding of how neural circuits spanning the entire brain generate the full repertoire of perception and behaviors requires a list of brain cell types, as well the means to target each cell type in order to interrogate the functional interactions that give rise to the emergent properties of the whole system. Neuronal diversity is essential for mammalian brain function but poses a challenge to molecular profiling. To facilitate cell-type-specific epigenomic studies, we have developed approaches to isolate nuclei from subtypes of neocortical neurons, revealing highly distinctive epigenomic landscapes. Hundreds of thousands of regions differ in chromatin accessibility and DNA methylation signatures characteristic of gene regulatory regions which are predicted to bind distinct cohorts of neuron subtype-specific transcription factors. Surprisingly, neuronal epigenomes reflect both past and present gene expression, with DNA hyper-methylation at developmentally critical genes appearing as a novel epigenomic signature in mature neurons. More recently, we have developed single cell methylome profiling methods that now allow an unbiased census of the diversity of neuronal cell types in the mammalian brain. Taken together, these approaches are beginning to link the functional and transcriptional complexity of neurons to their underlying epigenomic diversity.

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 14 September 2018, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJoanna Wysocka , Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, Stanford, California, USAHost: Jamie HackettCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 12 October 2018, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenetic regulation by histone acetylationAsifa Akhtar, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology, and Epigenetics,Freiburg, Germany , , GermanyHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Rome
Abstract: Our lab is studying the chromatin and epigenetic mechanisms regulated by histone acetylation using evolutionary conserved complexes associated with MOF, a MYST family of histone acetyl transferase. In files and mammals MOF is associated with the MSL and NSL complexes, which are important regulators of gene expression. In flies the MSL complex is well known for regulation of the X chromosome by the process of dosage compensation, while the NSL complex regulates expression of house keeping genes. In mammals, both complexes appear to be involved in regulating diverse cellular processes. The recent progress of our work will be presented.